OT (kinda) - Hardi Panel Siding w/o sheeting

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On 10/8/2010 1:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You're most welcome, Robert ... just a minuscule installment payback on the spraying advice!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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WOOF!
I like it! Somehow, I would expect nothing less from you. The more I think about this detail the more I like it.
SNIP

I went to a couple of free seminars years ago that Southwest Research put on for our builder's association that concerned airflow and its relation to cooling and heating a house.
They were very keen on air movement, regardless of the climate, unless of course looking at extremes. (For example, the same insulative processes wouldn't be used in Anchorage as Arizona).\
It was the same idea that got me onto ridge vent on houses almost 20 years ago. Yours truly was one (if not the first) to start putting ridge venting on houses.
The sold me by showing me a video from an independent lab of two small, one room buildings of about 250 sq ft. with conventional turbines (2) on one and continuous ridge vent installed on the other.
They set of a mil spec pink smoke bomb in the attic to test the air flow.
The attic space (eyeballed about a 5/12) was timed to see how long it took the smoke to be completely exchanged with clean, fresh air from outside.
The turbine roof took over two hours! The roof with the ridge vent took just a little over twenty minutes to clear the smoke. The amount of heat that was whisked away was incredible. I was so impressed that I contacted Owens Corning and they sent me copies of the VHS tape that I saw and I used them as sales tools.
I certainly don't see how a continuous air flow powered by mother nature's heat would work any differently on your siding detail than on a roof/attic detail. It is the same exact principle, so I would expect the same results. Good results.
Thanks for taking the time to type all that out, and the good explanation that came with it.
*thumbsup*
Robert
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wrote:

An attic always has more heat gain, even if shaded by trees, than siding on the North side of the building, so the temperature differential and the chimney effect is greatly reduced.
The eave/ridge vents are there to remove heat, and to some degree, moisture. Rain screen design is meant to reduce moisture, and has an added benefit of reducing heat gain, but heat gain is not always a bad thing - at least not in all climates. I want all the heat gain I can get in winter.
R
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It sounds like you routinely set the nails below the surface and then putty. Am I reading that wrong?

A common variation around here is to have the vented rain screen vent at the top of the wall and the air does not enter the attic space. There's a move to unvented with spray foam insulation, which prevents any air at all from getting into the attic. A similar folded screen 'cap' is at the top of the wall vent screen, and it is hidden by horizontal trim running under the soffit.
R
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Absolutely will hold up. Like most cement or brick prioducts Hardi products are porus and do not fit together tightly enough to prevent water from blowing in through the bottom of the panels or joints. The moisture barrier is to protect the contents not the siding.
I have used the Hardi "planks" on my home and on my shed. I strongly suggest you do some cross bracing of the walls and not rely on the Hardi or any product of similar nature to ad structural strength of your shed. Hardi prioducts are a strong siding that lasts many years but if the wall wiggles the fantener holes in the product will wollow out. Use this type siding to keep the elements out and not to add strength to the structure.
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Leon wrote the following:

Perhaps the moisture barrier is also to prevent water wicking through the hardie board into the wood studs?

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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That AND the hole that the fastener is not a tight one, Hardi does not seal up tight against the fastener like wood will. If the fasteners are exposed and not "perfectly" seated water can come through the hardi at the fastener.
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wrote:

No strength in tension if you mount Hardi panel with out backing it is real easy to break. Would not do Hardi panel without plywood under it. Your friend might just lean right on through it.
Mark
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