OT: Hand/Twist "Garden Tiller"

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I need to remove a whole bunch of really annoying viney weeds which someone else planted in my flower beds (they may have been "cute" at one time) --now it's time for all of them to go. It's not very difficult to dig out a shovel full, but that leaves too much work still (I did that yesterday--spending too many minutes freeing the roots from the dirt. The roots seem to amass themselves in small areas.).
I was thinking of this tool, but am not confident it won't just bend when I twist it. There's another one out there too that I'm curious whether someone might recommend.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Hound-Dog-Stand-Up-Garden-Tiller-HDP31/202605474
Thank you for your help (and tolerance)!
Bill
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On 4/14/2015 3:21 AM, Bill wrote:

I find that pulling roots and all is greatly aided if the ground is totally saturated with water.
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Boy that looks like work, and yes, I do understand about using a tool that may fail in the process..... I like the idea of wetting the area. I also like the old fashioned pitch fork with strong tines..... Usually the short one although one still needs to get down and dirty and take the weeds out. Is there room around the area to maneuver? Or is it in a tight spot? john
"Bill" wrote in message
I need to remove a whole bunch of really annoying viney weeds which someone else planted in my flower beds (they may have been "cute" at one time) --now it's time for all of them to go. It's not very difficult to dig out a shovel full, but that leaves too much work still (I did that yesterday--spending too many minutes freeing the roots from the dirt. The roots seem to amass themselves in small areas.).
I was thinking of this tool, but am not confident it won't just bend when I twist it. There's another one out there too that I'm curious whether someone might recommend.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Hound-Dog-Stand-Up-Garden-Tiller-HDP31/202605474
Thank you for your help (and tolerance)!
Bill
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wrote:

Round Up!
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wrote:

Won't that make the immediate area a dead zone for a year or two? Potential problem if he want to plant something else?
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No. Well, actually it depends on what product you use.
Info from the Manufacturer... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Thank you for contacting us and for the opportunity to help you with your lawn and garden endeavors.
Currently, we make several Roundup formulations. The time frame for reseeding or sodding the lawn after applying varies depending upon the formula. Below is a complete list for your review:
Roundup Weed & Grass Killer Ready-to-Use, Concentrate Plus, or Super Concentrate:
You will be able to seed or sod 7 days after treating an area with Roundup Weed & Grass Killer Ready-to-Use (blue cap), Concentrate Plus (red cap), or Super Concentrate (purple cap). The plant absorbs the product which then works through the plant's own system. Any product that is not absorbed by the treated plant will quickly break down. Because the active ingredients bind tightly to the soil, you can safely replant the treated area three days later; however to ensure complete kill of weeds you should wait seven days before disturbing or sodding over the area.
Roundup Extended Control Concentrate or Ready-to-Use:
You may reseed or sod the lawn four months after using Roundup Extended Control Formulas (silver/black cap). We recommend you do a radish test after four months to see if the ground is clear of herbicide. The radish seed is a very fast germinating seed. When planted in a treated area, the seeds will germinate in 7-10 days if the area is clear of herbicide. If the radish seed grows you can safely lay sod or plant grass seed. Do not eat radishes grown for these testing purposes.
Roundup Poison Ivy & Tough Brush Killer Concentrate or Ready-to-Use:
You will be able to sod or plant seed 3-7 days after treating an area with Roundup Poison Ivy & Tough Brush Killer (yellow cap). The plant absorbs the product which then works through the plant's own system. Any product that is not absorbed by the treated plant will break down relatively quickly allowing you safely replant the treated area 3-7 days later.
Thank you for taking the time to contact us and for your interest in our products. Please feel free to contact our company anytime we may be of assistance.
Allison Gostlin Consumer Response Representative The Scotts Company and Subsidiaries 14111 Scottslawn Road Marysville, OH 43041 888-768-6387 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jerry O.
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No, the normal RoundUp only lasts a few days, tops. There is a longer acting (silver bottle, IIRC) that is supposed to last a few months.
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The stuff you can buy for at home use is non persistant.
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On 4/14/2015 5:21 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Typically for a few months. In SE Texas we have a problem with crab grass in our yards. It looks a lot like our regular St.Augustine grass except it grows twice as fast. You can shoot it with Roundup and 3~4 months later the grass grows back, less the crab grass, or you can paint the individual crab grass blades with a Roundup saturated paper towel or small brush.
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wrote:

didn't do much of anything else either in loose soil. I don't think it will twist out most weeds - it wouldn't for me.
I like Markem's suggestion of Roundup. Paint it on with a cheap paint brush and wait a couple of weeks. If you didn't get a 100% kill, hit what's left with Roundup again.
Jerry O.
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On Tue, 14 Apr 2015 17:55:42 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

Mike if you cut down a tree you can kill the stump with Round Up and paint brush one of the cheap foam ones workk great. Mimosas I have cut down get this treatment, as they are invasive weeds.
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On Tue, 14 Apr 2015 17:55:42 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

Painting it on works just fine. It's the preferred method if the plants around the ones you want to kill are valuable.
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On 4/14/2015 4:21 AM, Bill wrote:

I have a similar tool, "Garden Weasel" or some such silliness IIRC, and I did just the job you describe perhaps ten days back. My tool is quite sturdy and has no problems even when faced with largish roots. My plant nemesis was Vinca minor (or was it V. major? I don't know if I could tell the difference). The tool did an adequate job of breaking up the top four inches of soil and ripped up big handfuls of the plant. I removed all I could and every day I look for more sprouts from the roots and runners left behind and gently pull them out. This is a _very_ persistent plant and I've heard it described as virtually unkillable, right behind Euonymus fortunii, but every day there seem to be fewer and fewer sprouts. When I see no sprouts for several days I'll re-mulch the bed.
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On Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 3:57:04 PM UTC-4, BenignBodger wrote:
Regarding Vinca minor/major, BenignBodger wrote:
"I removed all I could and every day I look for more sprouts from the roots and runners left behind and gently pull them out."
Many years ago I removed a storm-damaged Mimosa tree from my front yard. Mi mosa trees are notorious for having a very shallow root system. A few month s after removing the stump and lawn-seeding the area formally under the tre e, I began to notice Mimosa tree sprouts growing in radial lines from the s pot where the tree used to be. Some of these sprout lines extended 20-30 fe et from the origin.
I ended up pulling roots that were 3"-4" below the surface, all of which we re trying to replace the original tree with scores of miniature Mimosas.
I started the season by seeding the area where the tree used to be and ende d the season reseeding almost my entire lawn which was destroyed while remo ving the roots. What a PITA.
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On Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 4:21:10 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Durn speelchekr!
formally under the tree ---> formerly under the tree
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On 4/14/2015 2:23 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

attending to the task. :)
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

the stump and fill them with full strength roundup. The stump dies and all the suckers coming up from the roots die too. I had this happen with a Bradford pear and after working on the sprouts just to see more pop up from the roots I did the roundup in the holes bit and every sprout died and none have ever come back.
--
 GW Ross 

 I'm the world's foremost authority on 
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On Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 6:41:11 PM UTC-4, G. Ross wrote:

onths after removing the stump and lawn-seeding the area formally under the tree, I began to notice Mimosa tree sprouts growing in radial lines from t he spot where the tree used to be. Some of these sprout lines extended 20-3 0 feet from the origin.

.

removing the roots. What a PITA.

What is your definition of "the stump dies" and how long does it take?
The Mimosa that I got rid of was damaged by an ice storm. After it was cut down, I was left with the stump and all of the exposed roots around the stu mp. It was in my front yard and it was an eyesore.
I worked hard to get of the stump as soon as winter was over so I could pat ch the lawn and get my curb appeal back. There is no way I would have wante d to wait weeks/months/years for the stump to die off and rot away.
Even though I'd had to redo the lawn again in the fall because of the roots , by the following spring my lawn was done and looking beautiful. Would the RoundUp have completely removed the stump and allowed to seed the lawn in one season?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

The trees I had problems were in established flower/shrub gardens. I was not about to tackle a 2 foot diameter stump there. The problem was the shoots sprouting from all the far-flung roots. Roundup solved that problem.
--
 GW Ross 

 If I had only known, I should have 
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BenignBodger wrote:

Thank you for your reply, Bodger and everyone. I just learned there are ALOT of different weeds out there. I didn't find mine, but it is strong and viney and persistent as all get out. I would say the root on mine run about 4" deep too, so I have a very similar, problem. Bodger outline a procedure that makes sense. I may add chemicals around the edges--I need to read more first.
Thanks, Bill
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