Old butcher block for workbench top?

Hello,
I may have a chance to get some old butcher block that's being removed from a restaurant remodel. The plan is to use it for a workbench top. Any reason to be concerned about it from a health standpoint, considering how it has been used? My thought was to scrub it down with a water and bleach solution, then have it planed in order to both clean and true it up. Any comments or suggestions?
Thanks in advance to those who post a reply.
Peter.
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I'd imagine it would be relatively safe once you have implemented those measures you speak of. Bleach kills just about everything! including the HIV virus believe it or not.
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Yep, bleach should be sufficient. Believe it or not it works best if it is diluted and not used full strength. As for planing, no need. Simply turn the block over. I guarantee that no one has been chopping on the underside.
-Jack

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If it was used in a restaurant, do you think it contains something that can kill you? Did they have any repeat customers or where there always a lot of ambulances in the parking lot? I think you'll be fine whether you treat it or not, especially since you are only using it for a workbench top (and I envy you for such a find...if it's old, I guessing it's quarter-sawn maple glued on the flats and you will be passing that workbench down several generations). .

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wrote:

Even assuming it's full of whatever it's full of, then it's going to be safer as a workbench than it would have been to leave it in the restaurant kitchen. Give it a good bleaching if you want to, by all means.
Will you need to flatten it ? Sounds like a good excuse to buy a big L-N low-angle butcher-block flattening iron 8-)
How big is this thing ? I've seen butcher blocks in kitchens, but never one big enough to use as a benchtop.
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Professional butcher blocks can be quite large.They weigh a ton too

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