Office furniture edgebanding (PVC, T-profile)?

I want to make a desk with a laminate top and treat the edge similar to what you see on office furniture. It's surprisingly hard to find. I've turned up a few suppliers from old rec.woodworking posts:
    http://www.outwatercatalogs.com /     http://www.edgecoinc.com /     http://dc-dist.com /     http://www.canplast.com/ (a manufacturer?)
The T-profile mouldings sold by Outwater Plastics are pretty straightforward. Cut a slot with a router and push it in.
I'm curious about the PVC products. Are those just applied like laminate and trimmed/rouneded with a router? Is it practical do to this for a few desks or are there specialized tools required?
(I know wood is a perfectly good edge treatment too, but the end user does not want wood and given the curves I'm not inclined to argue!)
--
Ben Jackson AD7GD
< snipped-for-privacy@ben.com>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Woodworkers hardware http://wwhardware.com/ has it (t-edging) and a couple other alternatives, and even Rockler's has it (t-molding)
I've used it on some utility shop stuff. If you need to bend a tight radius, you may have to notch the pronged part in the area of the curve. If you do that, it will bend a tight radius.
HTH,
Paul F.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ben, you can buy T-moulding all over the place. There are a couple of tricks to that stuff. Make sure the slot is not too tight. You don't want the insertion to widen/split the edge. Also, make sure the T-moulding slot is set just a wee bit high, so that the edge peeks out a little bit from the top. 1/64 th if you can get it, 1/32 if you must. But not below the surface. Take a very sharp chisel and trim the excess...the word is SHARP. Approach with the chisel leaned back on the laminate as a guide. Also, make sure the stuff isn't too warm when you cut it to length. Most will shrink a wee bit when cooling. It is always better to be a little bit long.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Never argue with a client with curves
--Sham Shpade
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.fastcap.com /
These boys have all that and more....
Several others have commented on the correct installation... Remember..plastic will shrink and expand with temp changes.
Ben Jackson wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have got to start reading a little better... You wanted T-mold, which FastCap doesn't sell but their edging is quite good and I do recommend that.
For T-Mold, I would go to Hafele:
http://www.hafele.com/us/index.htm
Ben Jackson wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.