Office Desk is F I N I S H E D, whew!

Page 3 of 4  
email.me:
*snip*

Norm once talked about the "squares" method. Say your drawing is on a 1/4" square grid and you need to enlarge it 4 times. Draw a 1" square grid and copy each mark from the drawing to the larger grid.
As for getting Sketchup to do it, you may have to draw the grid yourself.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 8:43 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Exactly
And if Leon did it that way, what sort of curve did he use? As

It was an arc, a partial circle. After drawing the doors as if there would be no arc then I added the continuous arc starting on either side and extending to the opposite side. The line/ark was then pulled up to a desired amount. All very easily done with Sketchup.

Print to scale, and there is a trick to that so ask one of us how to do that. Simple to do when you know what has to be done. For larger pieces like the center arc you simply continue to print to scale but tape the pages together where the lines start and stop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 10:36 AM, Leon wrote:

Now I'm having a vision of Norm doing this on a circle jig with a 10' arm. "But you can do it at home with a pocketknife..." :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 12:21 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I just dimensioned that arc for the first time on the drawing.
The radius of the arc is 396 15/16"
You are going to need a 33' arm ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 12:23 PM, Leon wrote:

i find a more graceful curve on long runs like this is a catenary rather than part of a circle. that not withstanding, great job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 2:43 PM, chaniarts wrote:

Thank you
I think by definition the weight of the curve would come into play however perhaps that would reverse the curve, lower in the center and higher on the sides. I tried several variations including parts of an ellipse and this seemed to look the best in this situation. Actually looking at an angle the curve appears more elliptical.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 12:57 PM, Leon wrote:

i meant an upside down catenary. that would put the ends just a bit higher than circle ends, with a changing (and lessening) slope in between the middle and the ends.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 3:11 PM, chaniarts wrote:

Yeah, I see, in the drafting world I would call that more of an ellipse, but I understand now what you are saying now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 6:09 AM, Amy Guarino wrote:

Exactly! In Sketchup I drew the top unit and added an arc starting at the bottom of the left door top rail and ended it at the bottom of the right door top rail. Then in Sketchup I erased the parts of the ark that were not actually touching cabinet parts. I then built the doors and top center rail with no arc. I printed scale drawings of the arc's, to glue to each piece, to guide me while cutting the arc's.
Maybe I'd use a

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Amy Guarino wrote:

That's sort of what I would (do) do. The first thing I would do is decide whether I want the doors to be conventional (as Leon did) or if I wanted the door stiles to butt into the rails (which would give one continuous curve, uninterrupted by the stiles. In the latter case, the tops of the stiles also have to conform to the curve; harder but not insurmountable.
The second thing to do is determine the length of the board. If conventional, one needs a board equal in length to the inside width of the cabinet less the combined width of the stiles. Plus a fudge factor. If non-conventional, the board needs to be the length of the inside width of the cabinet. Plus a fudge factor.
The third thing is to make a template; plywood, hardboard, MDF are all possibilities. I like 3/8" ply. To strike a fair curve on it, I generally use a batten (thin piece of wood, maybe 1/8" x 3/4" x longer than the curve will be) or a piece of 1/2" PVC pipe. Mark the batten/pipe at the center and at each end where the curve ends will be, drive a couple of nails into the template material where the ends of the curve will be, align the batten/pipe at the ends and bend it from the center upwards against the nails; when you have the curve you want, drive another nail into the template material to hold it in place and draw the curve. If you are using pipe, be sure to keep the pencil vertical. Cut out the template with band or saber saw, clean up with plane and/or sanding.
When laying out/cutting the template, be sure to keep at least one square edge so that it can be properly layed out on the finish board. If you layed out the curve of the template relative to the edge that will remain straight you can always use that to reference the template to the finish board; still nice to have square edges though and they are absolutely necessary if the finish board is to be curved at top and bottom and if one screws up and cuts the curves before cutting the finish board into its various lengths. BTDT.
To cut the curve into the finish board, draw the curve from the template onto it, cut out with band/saber saw leaving the line, tape template to finish board and cut to template with router and pattern bit.
You asked about making the template half length and flopping it. I've done it both ways but prefer making a full length one. IME, flopping it can induce errors - especially at the center - if the alignment is off a bit. If it should wind up a bit less than symmetrical side to side, that isn't a catastrophe; unless it is gross, it won't affect joining and will never be noticed.
One other thing for your consideration is this: if the board that is going to wind up as the top rails of the doors is wide enough, one could cut a piece off the top of it to use as the top rail of the face frame. Also depends on the look one wants and the grain pattern of the other pieces of the face frame.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 10:54 AM, dadiOH wrote:

What sort of plane does one use to "clean up" the concave side of a piece of stock? In case it's not clear, I don't mean this in a snarky way; I'm not knowledgeable enough for that yet. :)
I mean, I'm guessing such special-purpose planes exist, but is there something I'm missing here? Could such a thing be reasonably done with a standard block plane?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Stanley #20 or Stanley #113 or record/kunz versions of same.
http://www.oldtooluser.com/TypeStudy/StanNo20cpTypestudy.htm http://www.oldtooluser.com/TypeStudy/StanNo113cpTypestudy.htm (Amazon.com product link shortened)
scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 3:14 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

That would be called a compass plane. The shoe will flex concave or convex.
Fine Woodworking #227 has a nice article on them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Guarino wrote:

How well a block plane would work depends upon how much curve there is in the wood and how the plane is held relative to the work; the closer it is held at 90 degres to the work the less contact of the sole and the more it will clean up.
A round or curved rasp works too. Ditto scrapers.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 3 Apr 2013 16:13:33 -0700 (PDT), "Gramp's shop"

Yup. I'm sure that Ole' Leon could make a good living as a designer if he put his mind to it. In any event, it's a design aspect that I'm stealing and squirreling away for future use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/4/2013 1:31 AM, Dave wrote:

One of my favorite Leon pieces is a Texas Desk he made for a client a few years back, he really needs to post some photos of it.
Hint, hint ...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/4/2013 12:37 PM, Swingman wrote:

Hint taken. ;~)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/8621157675/in/photostream
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, April 5, 2013 8:20:30 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote:

a Texas Desk he made for a client a > few years back, he really needs to post some photos of it. > > Hint, hint ...

Yep, that work is pretty darn (tootin) good, too.... ..... for a Texas dude! :)
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2013 9:28 AM, Sonny wrote:

a Texas Desk he made for a client a > few years back, he really needs to post some photos of it. > > Hint, hint ...

Thank you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/4/2013 1:31 AM, Dave wrote:

I love people stealing my designs, No better complement!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.