Odd; Festool price display policy at Woodcraft- Baltimore

Page 3 of 4  
On 2/27/2011 8:43 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

Hope springs eternal ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I love it. The 12V version was an eye-opener. I'll never use a drill to drive a screw again.

I have a couple of DeWalt 18V drills that I never use. I'll likely sell them on eBay, or something. I have a lot of things that use the batteries, though.

I didn't drop the soap!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I kinda thought that way but when it comes to furniture and the smaller #7 pocket hole screws and regular square drive #8 going into hard wood you can very easily split the wood if you put a little too much on it. I still prefer the drill driver for applications where too much torque might screw things up. For rough application where appearance at the screw location is not a factor the impact sees a lot of action.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have the 12v Milwaukie Impact driver, and I love it. Especially the fact that it has an adjustable clutch on it that many including my Makita don't have.
"Leon" wrote in message wrote:

I kinda thought that way but when it comes to furniture and the smaller #7 pocket hole screws and regular square drive #8 going into hard wood you can very easily split the wood if you put a little too much on it. I still prefer the drill driver for applications where too much torque might screw things up. For rough application where appearance at the screw location is not a factor the impact sees a lot of action.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Humm good to know, I knew Panasonic had that feature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yeah, the impactors are designed for construction applications, but once you use one for awhile, you get to know their trigger/torque factors and can control them fairly well.
For predrilled holes, I'd still use a drilldriver on furniture.
-- Invest in America: Buy a CONgresscritter today!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'm pretty familiar, 6 years so far..., not saying that it is impossible but when I am in a production mode I would rather pull the trigger until the clutch clatters and move on to the next. I certainly have used the impact for quicky situations and certainly when setting up and attaching kitchen cabnets to the walls.

LOL and I try to use the higher speed of the impact for drilling, think the Snappy system.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yeah, I've used the impactor exclusively for hanging cabinets. MUCH better tool, much quicker job. 1/4" hex heads are king there, with a 1/4" hex to 1/4" square adaptor and magnetic bit.

I have and use both. I'm not entirely happy with the impactor batting the drillbits around, but it gets it done in a quick manner.
-- That is what learning is. You suddenly understand something you've understood all your life, but in a new way. -- Doris Lessing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was fortunate enough for someone, don't know who, to give me a Bosch Impactor 18volt unit. I have a Makita 6 year old 12 volt impact driver and that is still the one that I reach for first. I found that the 12 volt Makita had no trouble twisting off a black 1/4" hex to 1/4" socket adapter when driving 5/16" lag bolts that were 3.5" long going into the edge of predrilled 2x's. I am not really sure how much more umph I get out of the 18 volt Bosch over the 12 volt Makita as using them side by side for the same purpose I cannot tell any difference except for run time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

According to the Makita site, their 12V Li-ion impact driver delivers 800in-lbs (same as the 12V Bosch). The 18V Bosch is 1500in-lbs.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No doube however I think the biggest advantage is going to be run time as I think for most applications the extra torque may tear dattachments up faster. I have not yet run across a fastener that my 12volt impact will not drive with a fully charged battery. Now if my 18 volt Bosch and a 3/8" dirve instead of the 1/4" drive..... I
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I think my Makita is 1430 in/lb, enough to take the wheels off my truck. Strong enough for me. I actually twisted a 1/4-1/2" adaptor in two with the Bosch 14.4v Impactor, and a 1/4-1/4" adaptor with the Makita, installing 1/2x6" lag bolts for a deck ledger board. Try that with a drilldriver sometime. <g>
HF, of course. I finally bought a US-made 1/4-1/4 adaptor and it has held up better...so far. And now I just run the lags up with an impactor, then tighten with the 1/2" ratchet.
-- That is what learning is. You suddenly understand something you've understood all your life, but in a new way. -- Doris Lessing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fooled YOU! I bought a BTD141 kit last year before starting a deck for a client. ;) I love it, too. The 3.2AH stacks of lithiums bring the tool up to a pound lighter than my old Bosch 23614. See, I'm not just a one-trick HF pony. ;>

Not EVEN! You can buy one Festering OR two Saurstops OR 'lebentytree other powah tools for the same price.
-- You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club. --Jack London
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 26 Feb 2011 16:00:37 -0500, "TimDrouillard"

Highland Woodworking in Atlanta has the master price list sitting out by the tools. The Woodcraft there, and IIRC the one in Birmingham, have prices marked on stickers on the packaging (systainers, in the case of power tools).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
september.org:

In some states, it's illegal not to post prices at least next to an item. It used to be everything had to have the price clearly marked on the item, but inflation made that problematic for some places. As long as you turn over your mechandise faster than the prices go up, it's not such a big deal.
Unless I REALLY need a specific item, I generally avoid stuff that isn't priced. I also try to arrive at a store with a good idea of what the going rate is. I'm certainly not going to buy an expensive power tool without shopping around first, even if I decide to pick it up at a local store.
Doug White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/26/11 8:38 AM, Doug White wrote:

As long as there's a tag on the shelf, I don't see why every item needs marked. I know there are still states with that antiquated law, but bar codes kind of did away with that need.

How many times do we go to a store knowing exactly what we need and how many times do we go in thinking, "there are several ways I can do what I need to do, let me find the cheapest?" If I have to take a salesman (or catalog) around the store with me, I'm outta there.

My smart-phone has revolutionized my shopping experience. I just scan the barcode and it googles the product to show me all the prices on the internet and other local stores.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If this is a Festool policy, then someone report Rockler. Either haven't got the flyer or there was no flyer. My take is the retailer feels that if the customer sees the tool and the price simultaneously, they will be inclined to walk the other way rather than inquire about the features which may otherwise incline them to consider a purchase in spite of the dollar tag. IOW, Woodcraft wants to justify a purchase with the sizzling spiel before revealing a cost figure.
Whether they have actually run a test of both approaches which decided them on this one as a better contributor to their bottom line...who knows? But if Rockler's current handling of the same product line means Woodcraft is lying...then the thought of where else the profit motive will have them decieving their clientel is something I'd consider before stepping in the store at all.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey Edward Hennessey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edward Hennessey wrote:

I have a Rockler and Woodcraft within driving distance. I think Rockler's prices are often about 25% more than Woodcraft's--which helps them complensate for all of those 20%-off coupons they send out every week. I'd rather they not sent the coupons, and just adjusted their pricing. Like some other posters here, I'm getting impatient with pricing "games".
Bill in IN.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Strangly enough, Our Rockler seems at least 25 percent cheaper than our Woodcraft. In Houston and we still get the good coupons.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Odd -- we're talking about the same stores, but my perception is the reverse. Starting buying primarily at Woodcraft, now generally shop Rockler.
Woodcraft does have better depth in turning chisels (i.e., more than just Sorby), including a decent house brand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.