O/T: Need To Build A Puter

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This hasn't really been a problem since 1995. Once PCI superceded ISA/EISA/MCA as a bus architecture, and ACPI came along as a standard mechanism for the BIOS to convey confguration information to the operating system, hardware has truely become plug and play. PCI (& PCI-X) only had 4 defined interrupts (per PCI bridge) orignally anyway; until MSI and MSI-X came along. With PCIe (PCI-Express), multiple PCI root complexes and MSI-X, there are effectively more physical interrupt vectors available on the I/O side than the processor can handle (the x86 processors are limited to 256 entries in the interrupt vector table).
That's not to say that particular operating systems (such as win2k or xp) don't have driver conflict issues - but that's not a hardware problem.
scott
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Hmmm.... reading your posts, it does seem that you might have a bit of a comprehension problem. I never said I picked out all components for construction in a day. I never said that I checked parts for maximum compatibility in a day. I never said I bought a case, fan, power supply, video card, memory, in a day, nor any other part.
Having all carefully selected parts in front of me (last two computers I labored over parts for a month), I can indeed get one together in an eight hour period.
Might I
<I trust the people making comments like this are

that don't read and understand the written language? Ones that might jump to conclusions based on their own arrogance?
With little doubt, I would say that anyone that did not select their parts beforehand is an idiot. Was that your assumption, even though it was never expressed, written, or alluded to in any way by me?
With all selected parts in hand, my computer guy can put a machine together in a couple of hours, install the OS, and run all his diagnostic software in a couple of more. He can have a new machine out the door in 4 - 5 hours, but her prefers overnight self diagnostics. He has done it for me and my business associates many, many times as he does it all day long. The diagnostics run far longer than the assembly time from him.
As I said, for me, it would take a full day (if all assembly went right and there were no DOA parts.)
It appears, your mileage may vary.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This is what YOU WROTE:
As for me, I split the difference. Although I don't mind working on one, I didn't want to build it myself either as I would be spending an entire day doing it. So I paid a friend of mine to build it for me at the going rate of $100, including having him do all diagnostics on the machine and print out reports. I got it from him, took it home, hooked up the monitor, modem, mouse and speakers and off I went.
You didn't want to spend an "entire day" building a computer??? My reply was NOT directed at you. I wrote: I trust the "people making comments like this". That was not meant to include you. Just forget it and go on with your life. F*** your arrogance.

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Gosh, I hope so. Like you said when you were being a jerk, that's not the time-consuming part.
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Christ, my students used to be able to tear one down and reassemble it in 4 hours.
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My lab guy routinely does it in 30 minutes. 15 minutes to swap out a power supply, mobo or processor. 5 minutes to swap out dimms (most of that removing/attaching cables so the system will slide out of the rack). There are currently about 300 1U and 2U boxes in the lab (all servers); including one that has 192 cores, 1 TB DRAM and 100TB disk.
But he's been building mainframes, large MPP machines, small unix boxes, servers and PC's for 30 years.
scott
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"Scott Lurndal" wrote in message wrote:

My lab guy routinely does it in 30 minutes. 15 minutes to swap out a power supply, mobo or processor. 5 minutes to swap out dimms (most of that removing/attaching cables so the system will slide out of the rack). There are currently about 300 1U and 2U boxes in the lab (all servers); including one that has 192 cores, 1 TB DRAM and 100TB disk.
But he's been building mainframes, large MPP machines, small unix boxes, servers and PC's for 30 years.
scott
====== I can take a baseball bat to an acting up old system in less than 5 seconds.
--
Eric


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On 7/17/2011 4:48 PM, Eric wrote:

I believe you just won the pissing contest.
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@swbelldotnet says...

Half an hour sounds about right for an experienced builder.
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Classic moronic faker. You can't install the O/S in half an hour.
Crikey! My mom could lick your dad with his hands tied behind his back and a blindfold on.
------------ "J. Clarke" wrote in message
Half an hour sounds about right for an experienced builder.
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I beg to differ. In our lab, we use PXE to install the system, and it gets installed with our hypervisor and control domain (a linux OS).
The BIOS is configured to boot from the network, our DHCP server points the BIOS to a host configured with a /tftpboot directory containing the install image for the O/S and the BIOS downloads the kernel and initial RAMdisk image from the /tftpboot directory on the boot server and executes it. From there, it's just like a standard CDROM install, except it uses NFS to access the distribution over gigabit ethernet.
The entire install takes exactly 3 minutes and 15 seconds[*]. Trust me, I do this dozens of times a day when testing changes to the hypervisor.
Interactive Windows may be a different story, but your claim that an O/S can't be installed in 30 minutes is shown to be incorrect. For Windows, you can Ghost an image in under 10 minutes from a golden master, and we have a product called Power Cockpit that does unattended windows installs over the network configuring the registry automatically per site template; I don't recall how long a windows provision takes, but it is certainly much less than 30 minutes.
An interactive redhat/centos 5.5 install takes about 16 minutes from CDROM, depending on hard disk speed (15kRPM SCSI or SSD will install in less than 10 minutes).
scott
[*] 2 minutes 4 seconds when the system has SSD instead of rotating media.
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What system would he use to build his ghost image? It would take him a day to create a temporary system to make the ghost image, then he would have to tear it apart and send it back to the seller.
None of that applies to a unique one of a kind, stand alone user system build, as the faker was referring to.
I used to use O/S systems that fit on a FDD too. Over 100K was big then. Once Linux grows up it will compete with the User system O/Ses. Until then mark it with a Red Hat, Alberta symbol and keep it for control systems and servers that don't like Users, expecting the O/S to work for them instead of them adapting to the O/S.
LOL -------------------- "Scott Lurndal" wrote in message
I beg to differ. In our lab, we use PXE to install the system, and it gets installed with our hypervisor and control domain (a linux OS).
The BIOS is configured to boot from the network, our DHCP server points the BIOS to a host configured with a /tftpboot directory containing the install image for the O/S and the BIOS downloads the kernel and initial RAMdisk image from the /tftpboot directory on the boot server and executes it. From there, it's just like a standard CDROM install, except it uses NFS to access the distribution over gigabit ethernet.
The entire install takes exactly 3 minutes and 15 seconds[*]. Trust me, I do this dozens of times a day when testing changes to the hypervisor.
Interactive Windows may be a different story, but your claim that an O/S can't be installed in 30 minutes is shown to be incorrect. For Windows, you can Ghost an image in under 10 minutes from a golden master, and we have a product called Power Cockpit that does unattended windows installs over the network configuring the registry automatically per site template; I don't recall how long a windows provision takes, but it is certainly much less than 30 minutes.
An interactive redhat/centos 5.5 install takes about 16 minutes from CDROM, depending on hard disk speed (15kRPM SCSI or SSD will install in less than 10 minutes).
scott
[*] 2 minutes 4 seconds when the system has SSD instead of rotating media.
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Speaking of comprehension problems!!
It was a typo. The OP wants a new "puter" to use on the golf green this summer.
---------------- wrote in message
Hmmm.... reading your posts, it does seem that you might have a bit of a comprehension problem. I never said I picked out all components for construction in a day. I never said that I checked parts for maximum compatibility in a day. I never said I bought a case, fan, power supply, video card, memory, in a day, nor any other part.
Having all carefully selected parts in front of me (last two computers I labored over parts for a month), I can indeed get one together in an eight hour period.
Might I
that don't read and understand the written language? Ones that might jump to conclusions based on their own arrogance?
With little doubt, I would say that anyone that did not select their parts beforehand is an idiot. Was that your assumption, even though it was never expressed, written, or alluded to in any way by me?
With all selected parts in hand, my computer guy can put a machine together in a couple of hours, install the OS, and run all his diagnostic software in a couple of more. He can have a new machine out the door in 4 - 5 hours, but her prefers overnight self diagnostics. He has done it for me and my business associates many, many times as he does it all day long. The diagnostics run far longer than the assembly time from him.
As I said, for me, it would take a full day (if all assembly went right and there were no DOA parts.)
It appears, your mileage may vary.
Robert
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I ordered mine directly from Lenovo. Don't let them sell you anything other than a Thinkpad, the ONLY system available with a decent keyboard. (Toshiba had a good layout, but the keys are slicker than a properly polished table saw top.)
Online, I usually check Newegg (newegg.com) and Computer Geeks (geeks.com -- they usually have slightly older stuff).
Puckdropper
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Lew,
Check out these guys. In San Diego but they ship everywhere. I have had very good luck with them over the years.
http://www.thechipmerchant.com/store /
Good Luck, Steve
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On 7/14/2011 3:45 AM, Steve wrote:

Have you considered the online sites of the major computer dealers like HP, or your favorite brand?
What about the nationwide office supply stores like
http://www.staples.com /
The online sellers
http://www.buy.com /
Finally I believe Frys is in Southern California, but I know it is online.
http://www.frys.com /
I have bought things from each of the above and been quite satisfied.
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"k-nuttle" wrote in message

Which often means you pay too much and get proprietary software you don't need or want and proprietary hardware that is expensive to fix.
When my top-of-the-line Dell died recently I discovered it would cost twice as much to replace the motherboard as it should have, so I had a local shop build a new computer that ran circles around the Dell for half what the Dell had cost me.
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On Thu, 14 Jul 2011 09:43:08 -0700, "DGDevin"

" Dell from Hell"
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wrote in message

DELL -- Doesn't Ever Last Long
They wanted about four hundred and sixty bucks for a new motherboard (and it would probably have been a refurb). Hell, they wanted sixty bucks just to talk to a service tech on the phone to figure out what was wrong. It's the only PC I've ever owned that died due to a parts failure that I couldn't fix, it was their top-of-the-line model too. I'll never buy another DELL.
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"Steve" wrote:

---------------------------- Has possibilities.
Thank you.
Lew
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