O/T -- cutting glass block

Number One son has drafted me for a bathroom renovation, which may involve installing a glass block partial wall. The rub is that he wants it flush against his sloped ceiling. Is it possible to cut glass blocks accurately and cleanly? Any tips will be appreciated.
Larry
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" snipped-for-privacy@teranews.com" wrote:

Glass shops do some interesting things with water jet technology and CNC control.
Might want to talk to one for some guidance.
Lew
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For interior use, the acrylic blocks are a good choice. they can easily be cut.
Glass blocks are never cut.. not that I have ever seen.
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Robatoy wrote:

i've never seen them cut and installed either, but a tile saw will go through one pretty quickly.
you can get 1/2 height blocks. i've also made a glass block out of stained glass and used that in a non-standard height place, or perhaps you can make a wood block and use it as a base or fill block on the top (obwwr)?
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On Mon, 11 Jan 2010 09:56:17 -0700, "charlie"

...I just did a kitchen and lady selected glass tile sheets for her splash...I went to the local marble/stone house and there on the wall was "glass blades"...bought one, installed on my wet saw, and she cut sweet as can be. Would have no qualms cutting some glass blocks. OTOH, is the ceiling sloped? If not, why not construct a "base" out of whatever material would complement the glass and set the blocks on *it?* Then you could figger the measures, block and grout, to come out with a grout line on top...
cg

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On 1/11/10 12:02 AM, Robatoy wrote:

How about using the acrylic blocks, just where the cuts need to be made, assuming you can get some with a similar enough appearance.
Just an idle thought. At the ceiling the difference should be less noticeable, and if you like the appearance of the glass enough to offset the disparity.
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Yes. Either water jet (easy, costs a little) or else a wet wheel tile cutter, and you'll lose a few.
Don't be surprised if some of them spontaneously crack a few days after cutting.
On the whole I'd avoid this. You need to seal the insides of glass blocks very carefully around bathrooms, otherwise you get condensation problems. Pragmatically I'd probably redesign until I could use full & half blocks, without cutting.
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As a follow up, I just happen to be talking to a block guy and I thought to ask him. If you absolutely MUST, do acrylics. If not, redesign. Cut glass blocks have all the problems Mr Dingley so aptly pointed out. Condensation and cracking.
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