O/T: computer question

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I just got a new laptop, delivered today. One big problem; the box was crushed. The monkey men of UPS did their best impression of the old Samsonite commercial and really mashed it.
(NO advice needed on how to proceed with a claim, informing the shipper, documentation for the vendor, damage claim number assignments, photographic evidence, etc.)
I am really concerned that this machine could have been damaged, although it seems to be performing OK. I have a 72 hour window in which the vendor will send out a new one without charging my account as an emergency replacement if I need one.
I am looking for a program like the old "Burn In" and "PC Test" that we used to use that is for Windows 7. Those programs tested all memory sectors, HD sectors, and did hours of read/write exercises, cache filling and dumping and CPU tests. You wound up the programs and let them go, and a few hours later you had your results.
I can't find anything like that for Windows 7, and want to test ALL aspects of this machine within my "emergency replacement" time frame window.
Anyone have any suggestions? A program that you have personal experience with or know someone that has used it successfully?
Thanks -
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Sisoftware makes a popular benchmarking program called Sandra. It has many features. However, I don't believe the "burn in" feature is turned-on in the version which is a free download. It's still a very nice program to be aware of and may be helpful to you.
http://www.sisoftware.co.uk/?d=&f=home&l=en&a Bill
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It happens that snipped-for-privacy@aol.com formulated :

Since you do not have any info/programs of your own installed yet, JUST call for a replacement and blame UPS. Simpler than trying to show some internal problem that neither you nor the supplier willunderstand.
--
John G



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On Tue, 6 Mar 2012 21:45:14 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

I understand your concern, but it sounds as though the packaging did its job. Items like a laptop are tested to withstand a minimum of 8 drops from 36", possibly higher. The protective packaging is designed to take the force of the impact.
OTOH, don't think that the perfect looking package did not suffer even more severe damage internally. Depends on how the damage was inflicted.
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UPS regs say they can drop a package 15' onto a hard, concrete floor. I've seen it happen. Conveyor systems are elevated in all UPS and FedEX processing plants. It sounds like more than that happened to Naily's unit.
-- Learning to ignore things is one of the great paths to inner peace. -- Robert J. Sawyer
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On Wed, 07 Mar 2012 07:16:34 -0800, Larry Jaques

How did you come up with that conclusion? It is also possible than it was not dropped at all, but the protective packaging material was crushed when something was placed or dropped on it and inflicted no damage.
FWIW, I've been in the protective packaging industry for the past 42 years so I've seen lots of different scenarios.
http://images.fedex.com/us/services/pdf/PKG_Testing_Under150Lbs.pdf http://www.theswisscolony.net/documents/SAPkgTstGuidelinesSmall-8-01-08_000.pdf
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When I wanted to ship something via UPS eons ago, it was written in their guidelines for packaging. And it's likely that Robert wasn't reacting to a simple ding on one end of the package. Most of us see and accept dinged packages, but we hold the deliveryman if there is more than just a wrinkle, making sure he either notes the damage in his recorder before he leaves or watches us open the package. Most people don't react like that or ask for assistance on a minor crease in a the cardboard box, knowwhatImean,Vern?

Yes, that is a possibility. Not having seen the package, I couldn't say. I added the possibility of a twist to the scenario, too.

Then you should know that the test procedures are not actually representative of what can happen in the real world. Ideally, the foam packaging absorbs almost all of the impact, but a 15' fall onto a single corner just might overstress the packaging. I wonder if Robert has pics...
-- Learning to ignore things is one of the great paths to inner peace. -- Robert J. Sawyer
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But it may or may not overstress the contents. One of my customers required a 26' drop (yes 26 feet). That was to simulate the drop from the cargo hold of and airplane. The package can be damaged, but the radioactive product could not leak.
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wrote:

One would certainly -hope- not, eh?
-- Inside every older person is a younger person wondering WTF happened.
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Thanks to everyone for their replies. I have been using the crap out of the machine and it seems to be in good order. Still testing, and looking at read/reread/write/testing software to make sure it is OK. So far so good. ED P. a special thanks to you. I got to thinking - hey, I should call MY buddy in the shipping business and let him look over this box and get his opinion. Ed, you were close without even seeing it. My pal Larry has been in and out of the shipping business for about 20 years as a pilot/loader/handler, jack of all trades for several cargo shippers, like a private label UPS, UPS, DHL and has even flown and loaded packages for FedEx. Working for a private carriers, he has handled mountains of packages for them.
Larry immediately came to the conclusion that the box was indeed crushed, not dropped. He inspected for impact damage, punctures, localized compression (new term for me - that means large impact over a large area such as a large damaged corner that caused stress over 25% of the length) and other things.
Sherlock Larry further concluded that the entire box had been compressed due to the corners showing parallel compression folds up the sides on all four corners in exactly the same fashion in exactly the same places. With the amount of compression, the tape popped, tearing off the thin skin of corrugated box. As he pointed out, the tape itself was not cut, torn or separated, just torn off the box top itself where it had adhered.
We were able to replicate this action in my living room by pushing the box against the wall. It folded perfectly along the damage folds in the box when I compressed the entire face of the box against the wall, which he assured me was the box performing as it was designed to do. The box popped open because they did a crappy tape job ( Jeez... were they running out of tape when they mailed this to you? was his comment) and the tape tore off the top layer of paper on the corrugated box because the box was average or less quality.
We put the box that held the computer itself (undamaged)back into the shipping box, and there was about 10" all the way around the computer box when inside the shipping box. They didn't use the best packing material (some kind of wound paper that was about a 6" tube about 15' long, but it did its job. His conclusion was that there probably wasn't any damage at all, that someone didn't see the box when loading and mashed some other freight against the box. I felt 100% better when we were able to recreate the mashing at will.
Tiger Direct has been princely about this, and told me that they would extend the replacement window to 30 days. I have a one year accident policy, as well as a TWO year parts/labor one way shipping on this machine. I intend to test it unmercifally, get a backup service and put it to work. One unknown click, one hiccup, on pixel goes bad, and this machine is gone.
So Ed, thanks for your post in particular. I appears that you were right on. And I had that great resource a phone call away and didn't even think to call him about this problem until you mentioned your long experience in the freight business. Larry was able to peel me off the ceiling, and now I can concentrate on getting this machine to work.
Robert
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On 3/9/2012 4:01 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
Snip, Snip
Snip, Snip
Snip, Snip
Snip, Snip
Snip, Snip
Snip, Snip
Larry was able to peel me

Wasn't that what you were concerned about??? Send it back LOL.. ;~)
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wrote:

+1, although with the inner box showing no damage whatsoever, I'd be a whole lot more relieved, too, were it my package.
-- Inside every older person is a younger person wondering WTF happened.
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On 3/9/2012 3:01 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

if you bought it with some credit cards (amex for one), they double the manufacturer warrantee. keep the receipt with your credit card statement with the shipping paperwork to get them to honor this.
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On 3/6/2012 11:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Robert I would still get a replacement. That said, the manufacturer "should" have the program you are looking for and should be more than happy to send or point you to how to get it. I know Dell used to have more of these testing programs than you could shake a stick at and they might be on a secret section on your HD.
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On Tue, 6 Mar 2012 21:45:14 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Not a direct answer to your question, but... I would get another one. It is possible that the mistreatment could have damaged a circuit board trace that a minor bump in the future could cause a total failure or intermittant problems.
A year from now it will be on your dime.
basilisk
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wrote:

Six months, a year, a long time from now, if something on your laptop doesn't quite behave the way you want/expect, your automatic inclination will be "I wonder if it DID get damaged." The possibility of that thought alone, would make me get a new one. It's the only way to remove that doubt.
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On 03/06/2012 10:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Here's a good standalone memory tester: http://www.memtest.org /
Download, write to a CD, boot up the CD and let it grind.
I'd be more concerned about hard drive shock damage than MB/memory damage.
--
"Socialism is a philosophy of failure,the creed of ignorance, and the
gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
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On Wed, 07 Mar 2012 06:52:29 -0700, Doug Winterburn

Memory is the last thing I'd think damaged in shipping. And with all the pins on newer memory, they stay in their sockets very, very well.

And I'd be worried that the whole thing got twisted, too. Mama is now arcing internally, the drive head is angled, and the display is tweaked but still working. Joys!
-- Learning to ignore things is one of the great paths to inner peace. -- Robert J. Sawyer
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On 3/6/2012 11:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That damned Butch ... screw up everything!
I would worry more about the hard drive than the memory.
Can't imagine why RAM would be effected even it the laptop was thrown across the room.
That said, MSFT had a memory test program on their website that could be burned to a CD. Memory diagnostics or something like that. You also want to back that up with another program, like memtest, as a matter of course.
Having used, and dropped more than a few, of well over a hundred removable hard drives in the studio, they are pretty robust as long as they aren't running, the floor is carpeted, and you're not standing on a ladder.
Use the built-in scan disk to test your hard drive. Unless there is visible signs of damage to the laptop exterior and something is rattling, I seriously doubt that you have a problem at all.
All that notwithstanding, send that sucker in and get a new one. No sense in taking a chance ... or else get a subscription to Carbonite and protect the data you're going to put on it, just in case.
--
www.eWoodShop.com
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On 3/7/2012 9:36 AM, Swingman wrote:

I don't know about all computers but there is a test for all components for HP computers. It test memory, hard drives, the video card, and other subsystems.
If there is damage, I believe it would be to the mechanical hard drive and not to the solid state systems.
It would take a terrific jolt to cause physical parts to come together to cause physical damage to a circuit board or other solid state system.
However why risk the problem when you can exchange it now for nothing, the company that made the delivery not the computer manufacturer or distributor that will ultimately pay.
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