No laser for Makita miters

Just talked to a Makita person re whether or not they intend to put out their sliding compound miter saws with a laser line guide and the answer was no.
The rep said they did extensive testing and weren't satisfied that the line stays accurate. I thought this was a good thing because it shows they care more about selling a quality product than adding the laser as a buyer incentive.
What does this say for the other laser guides that are out there, including the add-on one now available?
I have a 12" Makita laid away and that's why I asked if they would be adding the laser feature. May as well go ahead and get it anyway. I like their honest answer!!
Keeter P.
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I don't believe their answer. To me that is a salesman's answer. They don't have it so they belittle anyone that does. I added a laser to my older ls011 I think is the number. Anyway the laser is accurate at the top of the stroke... it changes as the saw is brought down...(I hear all of the type that mount to the blade do this... boy did it piss me off at first thinking my saw was crap) BUTTT that is fine... I have learned to deal with it... and for most work it is way more accurate than without it. The only place I am uncomfortable with it's accuracy is with compound miters...
Keith wrote:

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Re your respected comment....I guess this confirms what they say???
"Anyway the laser is accurate at the top of the stroke... it changes as the saw is brought down"
K.
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The problem I have with lasers is that you can't see a pencil line when the laser shines on it. I often make fine adjustments to my work piece, Often I'll cut to one side of the line or the other. Sometimes I want to cut down the center of the line. I'm talking 1/32 or smaller adjustments. I hate not being able to see the line when cutting. I always lift the guard out of the way so I can view my line and the blade. I just can't see the use for a laser. For people who never lift the guard I guess it's the only way to line up the cut.
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TaskMule wrote:

I've never had the opportunity to try to use one w/ the laser, but I've always been curious about whether they were actually very accurate for precision fits, as well. I can see it being a time-saver for framing-type cuts, but no substitute for either a stop block or the actual line for precision it would seem to me. The fuzziness of the edge alone (at least in all the pictures I've seen) would seem to be self-defeating for precision.
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If I was doing a lot of framing, I'd want the laser for the speed. For fine work, taking the few seconds to bring the blade down to the mark is a cheap price to pay for accuracy. The one that require the blade to be running for the laser to be on sound silly to me. I'll be damned if I'm going to make a precise alignment with a 12" blade spinning above my hand. My be OK for chopping a tubafor though.
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wrote in message

fine
cheap
for
a
I agree for framing and siding I would find it usefull. For my shop cabinet work my 1/72nd pencil lines are obliterated by the 1/16th laser
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TaskMule wrote: ...

Is (or can it be) set such that it would hit the edge precisely or is it (as I have presumed) a fuzzy-enough image that there isn't really that crisp of a line? If it were set to split the line, I don't think it would have a chance of anything but "in the ballpark", I agree...
I have no intention of ever paying for one, I'm just curious how well they might actually work... :)
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TaskMule wrote:

I actually prefer to cut cabinet and furniture joints that really matter on my table saw. My SCMS is for framing, cutting rough lumber to length, etc... A laser would be of little value to me.
Barry
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I made a zero clearance insert for mine and I use the kerf slot to align with the mark on the front edge of the board.
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Leon wrote:

Same here.
Barry
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I think I'll be sold on the idea when the laser can actually cut the ood. --dave

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That is for the blade mounted laser. The fixed type that are in the top of the housing I've heard resolve this issue. So the Delta w/dual lines (nice), and Crapsman shouldn't have this problem. I am not sure why, just that I've heard they don't have this problem, and confirmed with others that have the blade mounted that I am not alone.
I can say it is more than framing accurate... But for the very precise use a test cut and stop block.... Which eliminates more than laser error (minuscule ) compared to marking error, and (my sighting error). Yes the laser line is more than a hair wide, so your accuracy is compromised by that... but so is your line unless you strike it with a marking knife.... Funny I used to use a knife all the time... but I can't see the damn knife mark half the time anymore.... So how many times do you need the most accurate cutoffs??? Is it for repetitive cuts... 2 sides of a table ... use a stop block, you won't have any question... or leave a hair extra and use a shooting board.
Keith wrote:

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I bought a Laserkerf brand laser for my makita 1013 about two years ago. It's housing mounted and comes with well laid out instructions for mounting. It's not a perfect system, but it's a nice option that I use sometimes and am glad to have even though I have a carefully constructed cutting station. My set-up involves a solid table with 8' of t-track to one side and 4' to the other side. There are steel rules epoxied into each track. Replete with flip stops for ease of use and repeatability. Yet, I do use the laser when I'm cutting to pencil marks. [BTW, the laser duplicates the saw kerf - either 1/8 or 3/32 - so the laser doesn't obliterate the pencil line. You put the laser to the EDGE of the pencil line.] So, I like having the laser. But for $80 I'm just as happy adding it on myself and letting Makita do what they do well. That 1013 is a fine saw! ron
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