Newbie Skill-building

I am just starting and have everything to learn. Someday I would like to be able to build whatever pieces I need for my home instead of going to Ikea for them. Or make things that will heirloom in my family. But, first I need to learn how.
So, after much research, I have made a list of projects to develop the skills I will need to reach my goal of making fine furniture for my home (and possibly family and friends).
First off, jigs and fixtures. Not only would these get my feet wet, but they would then make future projects easier and more accurate.
Next stop, shop items like storage cabinets, shelving, workbench, etc. This would have some of the basics needed in joinery and finishing but if I screw it up or it comes out ugly, who cares. It's in the garage where no one will see it but me.
Then onto outdoor furniture (patio table chairs, Adirondack chairs, porch glider, etc).
And finally (hopefully), real furniture (bedroom dressers, kitchen cabinets, dining/coffee tables, etc).
I am open to comments. Does this seem like a good approach? Advantages/Disadvantages? Other suggestions?
Thanks,
codepath
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That sounds pretty good. The only thing is, quite a few jigs need to be pretty accurate themselves. I think in general, those might be best made when they are needed. It will slow down a few projects, but once they're made, you'll have them for future use. Where I work, a common first project is a cutting board. It's a good way to get practice with lots of machines and techniques. I think a couple small projects like that are usually the best thing to start with. If you're a quick learner, then after those you should be ready to do something a little more challenging.
-JB

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I agree and will add that you are most likely to use soft woods for a lot of those projects rather than hardwoods and there's a world of difference in machining each type. So try to mix your projects so you use some kiln dried, rough sawn hardwoods (oak, maple) that are relatively cheap from the mill.
Bob S.

project
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Bob S. wrote:

And he's going to do that with no planer or jointer how? I don't think he mentioned owning any hand planes either.
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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Michael ,
Did you even read his post before you jumped on mine? He didn't say a thing about owning or not owning a single tool. Now would you care to offer him some advice or is your game just to tweak someone today....
Bob S.

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Michael,
I just got his second post and if you had noticed the time on the posts, mine was posted before he sent his 2nd post listing his tools - so I had not read that.
Bob S.
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Bob S. wrote:

OK then, I won't jump on you for jumping on me for jumping on you, and we'll all just try to get along. How's that? :)
Anyway, I wasn't trying to ruffle your feathers. Just ribbing you good naturedly.
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I forgot to mention (and I understand that this will limit the range of projects and types of joints) that my current tool list consists of only a circular saw, jigsaw, table saw, miter saw, cordless drill, and a palm sander (no jointer, planer, drill press, router, or biscuit joiner).
And so, I will not be able to do much in the way of wood preparation from rough lumber. Given that, what sort of wood do I need to shop for (S2S, S4S, etc)?
Also, I will (obviously) be working from plans gathered from the mags (ShopNotes, PopWood, Wood, etc) and/or from reputable sources (PlansNOW, WoodMall, etc). Not quite ready to take on Norm yet.
codepath

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I have yet to see a vacuum cleaner designed for household cleaning that would work well in a shop environment without really messing it up. Check out Consumer Reports and see what they recommend.
Bob S.
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The 'Filter Queen" brand comes close. It's a "cyclone" design. picks up 2" nails, 3/8" nuts, etc. *without* any damage. And still filters stuff down to the size of smoke particles out of the air. Doesn't to wet pick-up, and has fairly small capacity, but, it's bagless, so it doesn't cost extra to dump it often.
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Robert, you may want to read this...
http://tinyurl.com/yrr3e
Also, I checked on the Consumer Reports site and could not find that they ever tested this particular brand.
Bob S.
wrote:

Check
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I haven't had occasion to look at new pricing for 'em in 30 years. Back then they were considerably less than Kirby, and price-competitive with brands like Royal, and Rainbow. Definitely pricier than the more pedestrian brands, like, say, Hoover or Eureka.
I wouldn't buy one new. Then I wouldn't buy a Kirby new, either. :) OTOH, I know people who's judgement I generally _do_ trust, who *did* buy Kirby vacuums, new.
Filter Queens _are_ available at 'rational' prices on the used market, however.

I speak from first-hand experience, as to its construction, pick-up capabilities, smoke filtering, etc. I've owned one (bought it used) for going on 10 years now. Was introduced to 'em about 30 years ago, when a duplicate bridge club I played at got one -- to use as a 'smoke remover'. It sat in a corner of the room, and ran the entire 3-1/2 hours of play. Made an *incredible* difference in the smoke levels, and was practically as quiet as the refrigerator.

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