Newbie-classes?

I'm a new woodworking hobbyist. 1st project at a local woodwork store was a lot of fun.
I live in Dayton, OH area. Looking for teacher, classes, mentor, etc.
I work FT days. Hope to find classes, instructor eves or weekends.
Thanks for your input.
Scott
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I'm not in Ohio, so I can't say anything specifically about your area. My recommendation, though, would be to maybe take another class at your local woodworking store, but to primarily get a few good books and start making stuff. Start small, with primarily hand tools if you don't have the space or funds to load up on a bunch of power tools. See what you enjoy, and pick projects that fit mostly with tools you have, or projects that might require one major new tool each time. I certainly don't claim to be an expert, but I've learned a lot from reading books, websites, this newsgroup, talking to friends, etc. I don't have any close friends that I'd call fine woodworkers, but a few good buddies are interested in basic construction and woodworking, and they often have some good ideas if I'm looking for some alternate way of doing something.
A few resources I've found helpful: The book that really got me started was a basic background of wood, woodworking tools, and techniques, and it also has "plans for 40 projects". There's a newer version of this that's pretty similar at: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pT903&cat=1,46096,46109&ap=1
Highland Hardware has a bunch of helpful articles in their "Library" section: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=Custom&ID=3
Any of the Taunton Press (Fine Woodworking) books are probably good, though a little pricy.
You could try a magazine - either subscribe, or buy a stack of back issues from eBay - those can be a good mix of instructions, tips, plans, and reviews, or they can be a bunch of repetitive garbage, depending on who you ask. Personally, my favorites are Wood and Fine Woodworking, but I also like Popular Woodworking and the few issues I've seen of Shopsmith.
Some detailed plans for a simple project you'd like to try can also be a good teaching tool. August Home (publisher of Workbench and Shopsmith magazines) has plans that are detailed, quite well illustrated, and fairly easy to follow, if you start with something pretty basic. One of my first major projects was a queen-sized mission style bed, based very heavily on an August Home plan. It took me quite a while, and I ended up buying several major tools I didn't start with, but I learned a lot and it came out very well.
Finally, keep reading here and search the archives with questions (easy through google groups) - there is a lot of great info, and a lot of other stuff. Just remember that someone who posts to a woodworking newsgroup (including me) might or might not be a woodworking expert.
I know I didn't directly answer your question about classes, but hopefully some of this might be helpful. Good luck, and most of all, have fun woodworking. Andy
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Andy wrote:

(clipped for brevity)

(more clip)

Yeah ... what he said. But I'd add "Shop Notes" to the list of beginner magazines. And suggest that a quick call or two to your local school district MIGHT unearth an adult education class or two.
Oh ... and welcome. We're not here to serve as 'loaner brains' but if you've given a matter serious thought and still don't have a credible answer, post the question here and we'll do what we can for you. (I mostly just watch).
Bill
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You can try a search on Google to see if it will turn up some of the woodworking clubs in central Ohio. I think there are quite a few. Some of them had tables at the last woodworking show in January.
"Scott S." wrote:

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Prior to posting question this user-group I sites via http://www.popularwoodworking.com/wwschools.asp . I'm looking for instruction local to DAYTON, OH.
Any feedback or comments on the quality of instruction at ShopSmith academy in Vandalia, OH?
Scott S.

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Scott:

Look for a local woodworking club. You are going to have to probably do this all on your own. Which means books, videos, etc. I don't know what kind of woodworking you want to do, but you will have to find someone you can trust that you can talk to. Most of us just start with a plan and try and try and try to get better. That's really the best way, I think. As far as understanding why things work they way they do, then you will have to go to a school. A local club is going to be your best resource.
Here's one in your area:
http://www.westernohiowoodworkers.org/index.html
Good luck!
MJ Wallace
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Hi Scott,
Here's a link to the Woodcraft list of classes in Dayton. http://www.woodcraft.com/stores/store.aspx?idQ3&nav=classes
The mix of topics is very different from what the Woodcraft stores do in my area, but the beginner class looks like a good choice. I have not taken any of these yet, but plan to take the beginning cabinet making and raised panel classes which happen to be available here. I don't know anytihng about these classes other that the descriptions on the website, so this is not a informed endorsement, just an idea.
The available classes vary from store to store, so you might check any other nearly locations for their list.
Good luck, Tom
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In fact, the class I completed was at the Dayton Woodcraft outlet. Excellent value for the money. $90, including white oak, instruction and info to complete a step sttol in 12 hrs. All usual shop equipment explained, demo'ed , used for the project. Instructor was very helpful and a nice fellow.
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I grew up learning woodworking from my father and I have been working with wood for well over 30 years now. A few years ago I took a cabinet making class at my local community college in Eugene OR. I got a lot out of that class and was exposed to a lot of methods I had never thought of before. I would reccomend checking out your local community college.
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Hi Scott,
Since you are in Ohio, I would check out Ernie Conover's classes. I took a bowl turning class and learned quite a bit from him. He has a wide range of classes and some are weekend classes and some are week long. Here's the link to his home page. http://www.conoverworkshops.com /
Good luck,
Dan

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