New bench

My forthcoming move to the new shop is underway. Three double drops have b een installed in the ceiling of the two-bay garage, running off a dedicated 20 amp service. I thought about adding a 220 circuit and moving the DC an d TS to 220, but concluded it wasn't worth the time or money.
I will now have room for a proper bench. I have a stock of reclaimed 8/4 c herry that is in 6-inch x 8-foot planks for the tops and legs. Top skirt w ill be hard maple. Finish will be Watco natural, although my first instinc t was 4-5 coats of semigloss poly -- but the guys at Sawmill Creek dissuade d me.
Question for today is on the vises, dogs and dog holes. I'm planning on bo th a front left vise and a side vise. I'm leaning toward the front vises a t Lee Valley: http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p1137&cat=1, 41659,41661. I think the smaller of the two will suffice, but I could be n udged toward the larger. Your thoughts?
For the tail vise, Lee Valley offers: http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page .aspx?p1136&cat=1,41659
With respect to the dog holes, it will be a lot easier cutting square holes before glue-up of the top than boring 3/4 inch holes through 2 inch cherry . Any thoughts on this approach? I plan on making my own dogs, although I saw some metal ones at Rockler the other day with a spring strip that woul d make them adjustable in height.
Looking forward to the usual lively discussion.
Larry
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On Friday, March 29, 2013 2:31:53 PM UTC-6, Gramp's shop wrote:

es before glue-up of the top than boring 3/4 inch holes through 2 inch cher ry.
I would think drilling holes would be easier. Sharpen your drill bit(s). Also, put your vises in place and align your holes with the vises. Pre-cut holes may not be aligned exactly right with your vises, though there is us ually some variance to play with, if you would possibly not be able to posi ton your vises as originally planned.
You may not want to do rough, nasty, dirty work on a nice looking (oiled fi rst coat?) cherry worktable.
Sonny
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On 3/29/2013 4:31 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

installed in the ceiling of the two-bay garage, running off a dedicated 20 amp service. I thought about adding a 220 circuit and moving the DC and TS to 220, but concluded it wasn't worth the time or money.

cherry that is in 6-inch x 8-foot planks for the tops and legs. Top skirt will be hard maple. Finish will be Watco natural, although my first instinct was 4-5 coats of semigloss poly -- but the guys at Sawmill Creek dissuaded me.

a front left vise and a side vise. I'm leaning toward the front vises at Lee Valley: http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p1137&cat=1,41659,41661. I think the smaller of the two will suffice, but I could be nudged toward the larger. Your thoughts?

before glue-up of the top than boring 3/4 inch holes through 2 inch cherry. Any thoughts on this approach? I plan on making my own dogs, although I saw some metal ones at Rockler the other day with a spring strip that would make them adjustable in height.

Sounds great. Either will work. For round holes I bought a HSS Spiral 3/4 for my router. Yes cutting the square holes before you glue up is easier than cutting squares after.
As far as finish, I worked on a friends bench who polyd it. It was awful. Things slid around. Some areas were cracked. I decided on tried and true. Its just ok, not very well protected. I did my junior bench (which I use for sharpening) in Boiled linseed oil. It's nice, but too slippery. I think if I thinned the BLO it would have come out nicer. I want no slip... I don't want things moving when I put them agains a stop for planing. But I don't want my sweat soaking in either.
Having a real bench is great, you'll wonder why you didn't do it sooner.
--
Jeff

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On 3/29/2013 4:31 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

installed in the ceiling of the two-bay garage, running off a dedicated 20 amp service. I thought about adding a 220 circuit and moving the DC and TS to 220, but concluded it wasn't worth the time or money.

cherry that is in 6-inch x 8-foot planks for the tops and legs. Top skirt will be hard maple. Finish will be Watco natural, although my first instinct was 4-5 coats of semigloss poly -- but the guys at Sawmill Creek dissuaded me.

a front left vise and a side vise. I'm leaning toward the front vises at Lee Valley: http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p1137&cat=1,41659,41661. I think the smaller of the two will suffice, but I could be nudged toward the larger. Your thoughts?

before glue-up of the top than boring 3/4 inch holes through 2 inch cherry. Any thoughts on this approach? I plan on making my own dogs, although I saw some metal ones at Rockler the other day with a spring strip that would make them adjustable in height.

One more thing. I had a bench that was too high before for planing. My new bench is perfect for planing, but not great for dovetailing. Too low. I am going to rectify that with a bench riser. A moxon type riser using pipe clamps for the vise. Figure out whether you will be using planes or not. if you are going to, lower is better.
just my opinion.
--
Jeff

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I have seen small platforms built just for that purpose. Planeing is an activity that takes place right next to the bench. The platform does not have to be big. I have seen small platforms like this also used around an assembly bench.
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"Gramp's shop" wrote:

---------------------------------------------- This subject has been beaten to death, but suffice to say, it is in your best interest to operate your power tools at the highest voltage available which for most shops will be 240V/1PH/60 HZ.
Lew
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