My wife just took me up on it!

Page 2 of 2  
On 15 Jan 2007 07:51:17 -0800, darryl snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com wrote:

This sounds like a troll.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My advice is to go to the library and check out a book on tablesaw use. Authors who come to mind are Kell Mehler, Cliffe, and (not sure of spelling here) Cristofero. They will cover safety and operation much more thoroughly than you can expect from usenet posts.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf.lonestar.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
darryl snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com wrote:

you're going to hear about "kickback" so here's more than you probably want to know about it.
http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/KickBack/KickBack1.html
FIRST PRIORITY GOALS WHEN WOODWORKING
Leave the shop with the same amount of blood as you entered with.
Leave the shop being able to count to ten on your finger tips. (OK so technically the thumb isn't a finger).
Leave the shop being able to SEE your finger tips - with BOTH eyes.
Leave the shop being able to HEAR yourself count to ten.
Leave the shop being able to count to ten out loud - without any coughing, wheeeeezing or sneezing
Don't let anything that's red, or has red on it, in your shop. Then, if you see any red - check yourself for leaks - immediately. Pain is often a delayed "notifier" - blood notifies you NOW!
charlie b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
darryl snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com wrote:

used power tools since I was about 10 years old. My dad taught me how to use his power tools and I now have a garage full of my own that do not see enough use -- for my tastes.
1. Wear your safety glasses. I make better cuts knowing that the likelihood of object embedding in my eye are greatly reduced.
2. Wear your hearing protection. CVS Pharmacy caries 50 pack of year protection that you scrunch down and stick in your ear. I use these now instead of the over-the-ear. My saw is very loud.
Yes, I get a lot of harassing from my friends but with the hearing protection in I don't hear them anymore. :)
3. Read and understand the manual.
4. Buy some cheap wood and make some practice cuts. I find the pine is pretty cheap and it is easy to work with. If you do not already have one, buy a square. Check your saw for square, and 45 degree cuts. Using the square you will be able to check these two out quickly.
Also, practice bevel cuts with your blade. You will need to learn how to adjust your saw for this. That is the purpose.
Also practice making some dado cuts with a regular blade, dado blade, and a router bit. This will teach you that a 2x4 is realy 1.5x3.5 . This should also teach you that a typical saw blade is about 1/8th of an inch thick.
I am not big on routers. I have one but it does not see much use. I should use it more.
30 years of sawing wood and still have all 10 fingers. Not a bad record. My dad nearly cut one of his fingers off a couple of years back. But he is over 70 and that was is first major mishap. I think my family has a good track record of safety. -G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Congratulations--she must like you.
All of the advice is good.
Can't remember if I saw that you should learn how to adjust it. A well calibrated saw works MUCH better than an almost calibrated saw.
I'd add, buy a book on using the table saw. There are ALL SORTS of things you can do with it, some I never thought of till I read about them.
Which book??--I've read a lot, and not found one that really stands out. Barnes and Noble usually has a good collection of woodworking books. Pull a few out and buy the one that looks the best for the least $$$.
Old Guy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mon, Jan 15, 2007, 7:51am (EST-3) darryl snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com doth posteth thusly: <snip> any safety tips ? Also...any one have some simple plans to learn the basics?
Keep your fingers out of the whirly parts, and don't stand directly behind the blade when you're sawing.
This is about as basic as you're gonna get. http://www.ag.ndsu.nodak.edu/abeng/plans/6396.pdf
Next time you might want to be just a leetle more specific on what you ask for.
JOAT I do not have the huge amout of faith needed to be an Atheist.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

Wow - you got a personalized plan from JOAT (and it wasn't even a pukey duck)! If I got one of those, I'd consider myself semi-officially "welcomed to the wRECk". Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It may sound trite, but read all of the paper work that came with the tools.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keep the body parts away from the moving parts.
No matter how small the router looks, It takes years of practice to master any type of acceptable "freehand" work.
Cheap bits/blades produce nothing but anger.
Keep your body out of the line of fire.
Practice with cheap wood and good bits/blades.
Read the manual twice.
Read the manual again.
Spend a couple of days aligning the TS. Go slow and follow the manual.
Spend a couple of days practicing with your router. A good edge guide and some good quality bits should get you started.
A good first aid kit nearby
Never wear gloves near the spinning things.
Go to the library or bookstore and get some of the mentioned books
It is easier to explain why you have to buy a new piece of wood than to have to explain to the ER doc why you are there that day.
Buy a good dust mask and then a better mask for finishing.
If you have a detached shop, a wired phone. You can have it be a cordless for carrying around with you, but alas a cell phone might not work out there at the "critical" moment. Also in the 911 centers, it would provide the number, name, and address for the dispatchers.
Start a simple project to try basic joinery. Advance as tool budget and time allow.
Allen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
darryl snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com wrote:

I'm not entirely sure what a table saw/router is but I'm certainly familiar with a table saw. Mine is old and frankly pretty shitty, but I picked up the Table Saw Book by Kelly Mehler. The book was recommended by a few people on this forum, and it's excellent.
Lee Valley sells it, but I suspect just about any large bookstore has it as well. I just did a search and LV doesn't have it any more. However, here's the link to what they don't have: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p0037&cat=1,46096,46119
I'd recommend reading it before you even fire up your saw. I know that's a really really hard thing to do, but I think it's worth the wait. You don't mention what size or kind of saw you got, but that's not too important for what I'm aiming at here. More people will respond to your post and tell you that there are tons of safety issues with table saws, and they'll be right. Mehler;'s book discusses them in detail and guides you in ways to avoid the problems - problems that new users might not even think of. A table saw isn't like a circular saw. It's got a bunch of things going on that you really need to know about and approach with caution.
It's not a machine that a woodworker should be afraid of, but it's certainly something that demands a great deal of respect.
Tanus
--
This is not really a sig.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
darryl snipped-for-privacy@rogers.com wrote:

Since the safety subject has been well covered, let me suggest a couple of simple things to make. Presumable your wife has already suggested something she wants for the house. If not ask her. Small picture frames are easy enough, rip some decent wood to size, rabbet the back to accept the glass, matte board and back. Miter the corners, glue them and reenforce the miters with brads. Storage boxes. Use 1/4" plywood for the bottoms and dado the sides to hold the bottoms in. Simpliest design is butt joints on all corners. You can work up to rabbet or rabbet-miter joints or that most elegant of all table saw joints, the finger lap.
David Starr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.