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My opinion is that you're overstating things along this line. Safe and proper operation should be a "given" hypothesis.

Either that or they think "Dayum, this saw cost so much, it couldn't have kicked back unless I was doing something wrong. I won't say anything about it because it's _all_my_fault_!" <snort>
-- An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last. -- Sir Winston Churchill
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On 10/24/2010 3:30 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

You're certainly welcome to your opinion. Mine is based on considerable use and operation of the particular genre of tool (rail guided plunge saw) ... yours, admittedly not.
Anyone is free to decide for themselves which opinion has the most merit.
> Safe and > proper operation should be a "given" hypothesis.
The only time "safe and proper operation" becomes a "given hypothesis" is immediately following the first accident ...

What is indeed a "given" is that these tools are not for everyone.
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"Swingman" wrote

under any circumstances.
From there, I suppose, there is a continuum of comfort level for each kind of tool. And there is a whole lot of hysteria and emotion concerning different types and classes of tools.
The ultimate demonization of a tool would be the radial arm saw. I grew up around them and used them for many years without any kind of problem. But many folks, who don't understand that spinning saw blades are inherently dangerous, cut off portions of their anatomy with them. Therefore, these saws are "bad". Or at least, politically incorrect.
Now we see another process at work. A super critical perspective of tools "that cost too much". But cost is relative. The folks who buy many tools are using them for their business. If the tool isn't doing its job, you would hear about it.
I may lust after tools I can't afford. But I am not going to whine about the tools because it is not in my price range. Nor am I going to whine about it if I can not justify the expense of the tool based on my current or future use of such a tool. If these tools did not perform a useful function, they would cease to be a viable product to manufacture and distribute.
Nuff said, end of rant.
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On 10/27/2010 12:49 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

I used a RAS almost exclusively as the 'goto' tool to build a couple of recording studios years ago. Have always have had a healthy respect for the tool, and got excellent results using it. (I don't think there was such a thing as a SCMS in those days)
That said, the pucker factor still goes up to this day when I see/got to use a RAS, which is probably a good thing.
That said, a router with a big bit, or an angle or taper cut on the table saw can flex the sphincter just as easily as the RAS for me.

Quality is expensive upfront, cheap over the useful life of the tool.

Good rant ... I buy whatever it makes business sense to buy to do the best job possible in the most efficient manner, and always try to build a purchase into the price of a job, or two.
When the pleasure from using a tool coincides with a legitimate business justification to purchase it, it feels good on all counts, including the fact that you're doing something right. :)
That counts for all "tools", from hand to software.
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sunsabitches....... I neeeeeed one.
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I still have to check and be sure the Rotek is really sanding. Too quiet no dust I'll get used to it eventually. Find I'm really disgusted when I use the belt sander with the mess.
Mike M
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wrote:

I don't find it much quieter than my old PC right angle ROS unless you are talking about the quiet from the vac also, but it took me about a year to get use to no seeing dust. It really does make you wonder if you are doing anything until you slide your hand across the surface.
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How are these on vibration? I can't use half the sanders out there because they simply vibrate too much.
Puckdropper
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Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Festool has a couple of "normal/standard" ROS with round disks. And the ETS125 is absolutely silky smooth and you can simply set it down on the work, turned on, and guide/push it with your finger if you chose to do that. ;~) Although not as aggressive as the Rotex sanders.
http://www.festoolusa.com/products/orbital-sanders/ets-125-eq-random-orbital-sander-571610.html
The Rotex sanders naturally have a bit more vibration especially in their "belt sander" aggressive mode. My rectangle pad RTS400 sander does not make my hand tingle after extensive use like both of my older PC SpeedBloc finish sanders did and those things were pretty nice.
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On 10/18/2010 4:24 PM, Swingman wrote:

Jim
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On Mon, 18 Oct 2010 14:46:53 -0500, Jim in Milwaukee

Piece of advice, I find I get much better results with the white "brilliant" paper than the red "rubin" which gave me no end of trouble with swirl marks.
-Kevin
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