Miter Settings

I've been involved in putting up some crown molding, and built a jig to hold the molding "upside-down and backwards." I'd like to miter a few inside corners to see how I do compared to coping (what a pain!), and am looking for a listing for miter settings for non-90 degree angles. I have a lot that are "close" to 135 degrees, and am looking for the right setting on the miter saw. I think I have to set it somewhere around 22.5 and not backwards, but I can't be the only one who ever had to cut one of these. They measure out to be anywhere from 132 to 138.
I have a compound miter, but I think the jig is a better way to go, since I don't have to trust the saw gauges as much.
Any ideas about the settings?
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vb53 wrote:

Trial and error. Use a couple pieces of scrap until you get the right angle. I usually use 1x3 to dial in the angle then cut the crown. You still need to cut it (the crown) upside down and backwards but the long point is at the top of the cut (the bottom of the crown).
I never cope crown. It's just such a pain especially when doing 6" stretch King George in oak. I do use a lot of inside cornices though which means the inside cuts are straight. It make the job easier plus it gives a more custom look (to some).
Gary
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Crown should always be coped, no exceptions in my book. If any wood movement should occur a simple mitered cut is going to reveal gaps/cracks sooner or later where a coped joint can hide them better. Besides man its just a matter of good craftsmanship I feel. You know the old saying, its the difference between the men and the boys? It applies here. Anyway, I posted a chart over at alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking for your reference. Should help you do what you're after to do.
Jim

stretch
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wrote:

I use two sliding t bevels. push them into the corner so that they fill the angle together, then sheck them against each other. adjust them so they coincide(split the difference). repeat and rinse...
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

Go here http://www.garymkatz.com/index.htm and look under the "charts and drawings" heading on the menu to the left. You'll see Joe Fusco's BIG list of miter settings. As a matter of fact, look at the whole site: one of the better sites for finish carpentry.
Kim
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On 26 Feb 2004 08:11:05 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (vb53) wrote: JDK is correct. Inside mitres are pron to failure. Cope withit!!!
TJB

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terry boivin wrote:

All that time wasted to cope when the cope joint separates just like an inside miter cut. Still looks like hell. And yes, I've seen it happen.
What's the difference? Maybe I'm missing something.
Gary

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The difference is someone who knows what they are doing and someone who does not. Obviously. Now see if you can figure out who is who......
Jim
(vb53) wrote:

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I guess then you've never worked on a new home where you can't control the movement of the green lumber used in the frame. I've seen this stuff shrink 1/2" and leave a gap behind the drywall, especially here in the desert where lumber is shipped in wet enough to spurt water when a nail is driven into it and it dries in a short period of time, usually after the house is occupied. Eventually, something moves and no one in this big world can know enough to keep the gap from occurring. Sure, it's not the fault of the finish carpenter but still, a gap is a gap regardless of how the joint was put together.
So your'e telling me you can prevent this from happening? Let me in on your secret. (when you come in as the finish carpenter and have nothing else to do with the house construction)
Gary
James D. Kountz wrote:

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Well damn Geedub I didn't know you knew me or what I've done and what kind of work I do. That's cool that you know though. Just so's ya know buddy I've been in this line of work 20 years and I've been there and done that so to speak. Yes shrinkage will occur that's a given but 1/2"?? Damn man that's excessive even by today's standards. You do understand however the difference between a joint that's in effect butted together and one that's fitted together right? Now if the crown itself moves away from the wall, then that's different. I think in that case I would move the hell out of the house if I had walls moving around 1/2" or more. Shoddy building leads to shoddy results. Simple as that. Just please do me one favor if you would. Never assume you know things about people you couldn't possibly know it makes you just look silly. Ok?
Jim
(vb53) wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@qwest.net says...

In my experience, a fundamental element of the coping process is the layout strategy: namely, you put the coped trim in the best position relative to the predominant view of the room. This way even if you get an opening of the joint, it is not as "visible" as it would be otherwise. With the mitered joint, the opening would be visible no matter what.
IMHO, a gap in a coped joint is still preferrable to a gap in a mitered joint: it looks better than the open bevels of a miterer joint.
Kim
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Thank you.
Jim

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Kim's explanation is what I was looking for. It makes sense. In all the years I've been doing this stuff, no one ever put it so succinctly. Funny how one can still learn new things if explained the right way (or viewed differently!).
Gary
James D. Kountz wrote:

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Well said.
--
"Cartoons don't have any deep meaning.
They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh."
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If there is an earthquake, anything can separate. The question is a matter of degrees. If your standard is a good looking joint when a wall is moving a half inch backwards and sideways, then you are right.

Put a good backcut on the cope and spring it in and even with some movement, it won't open.

A gap in a miter is apparent from every view. A gap in a cope is visible from only some. Because the shadow line matches the profile, most people still won't notice it if it is a little open. You, he and me probably would.
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Thanks everyone. I'll try both. those 135 degree angles are a real challenge for me though.
J
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