Minwax Date Codes

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Just thought I'd share this, in case anyone else has ever wondered how to read the date codes on Minwax cans.
Can of Minwax Wipe-on Poly shows the following coded information:
BATCH-MW1310C 00664 BLH
Decodes as follows: 131 means it was made on the 131st day of the year 0 is the last digit of the year of manufacture, 2010 in this case (presumably, any product manufactured in 2000 is no longer on store shelves)
00664 is the serial number of that particular can BLH are the initials of the machine operator
According to Minwax, the shelf life of an UNopened can is five years. They won't quote a shelf life for *opened* cans, but my own experience suggests that it's more than one year, but probably not much more than two. Certainly, by June 2012, varnish from a can manufactured in May 2010, purchased, opened, and used in June 2010, does not dry nearly as quickly as it did two years ago. It does dry. But takes 3x as long. I'm glad I tested that on scrap: the project in question was a wedding present, so the deadline wouldn't slip. I bought a new can. Guess I'll use the old one for shop projects...
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On 7/1/2012 6:48 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Jeez Doug! LOL
Now you have me wondering what Minwax deciphers the MW as. :~)
And what does the C stand for?
Anyway thanks, I am sure the 1310 is all one needs if purchasing a single can. Seems odd that each can would have a serial number vs. a batch number. Would Miniwax recall a single can or could you trust #00664 to be the same as #00700?
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Leon wrote:

Which reminds me of Jummywood.
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I figured it was a batch number, but their customer service guy said it was a serial number.
I'll check, next time I'm at the Borg, to see which it is. Should be easy enough to tell.
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On 7/2/2012 7:32 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

That does not surprise me at all.

Exactly! If it is actually a serial number there will be no two with the same number.
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Leon wrote:

Here ya go. Right off of the pages of Wikipedia:
A serial number is a unique code assigned for identification of a single unit. Although usually called a number, it may include letters, though ending with digits. Typically serial numbers of a production run are incremented by one, or another fixed difference, from one unit to the next.
I doubt that this comes as a big surprise to anyone--there is merely, perhaps, some confusion about terminology.
Bill

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On 7/3/2012 12:51 PM, Bill wrote:

Was there a doubt as to what a serial number vs a botch number was? ;~)
And again I find it odd that Miniwax says that their cans have serial numbers. Serial numbers are pretty much exclusively used to identify a specific single item. I do not see a reason for that in this particular situation.
Now if Miniwax actually mixed the product separately each time for each individual container a serial number would be called for.
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Why would anyone buy a product with a botch number on it? ;-)

How expensive is this stuff? ;-)
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On 7/3/2012 3:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

LOL I have seen some fine work done with Miniwax stains, I was never satisfied with it. So it is a botch number. ;~)

No kidding.. LOL
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All kidding aside, it really is a serial number. I checked at HD today; three consecutive cans on the shelf, all with the same date code, had serial numbers 04062, 04063, 04064.
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On 7/3/2012 10:18 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Wow! That is really strange.
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On 7/3/2012 10:35 PM, Leon wrote:

Shouldn't that be a blotch number?
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On 7/4/12 9:22 AM, Swingman wrote:

<ba-doomp chink!> Tip yer waitress.
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+1
-- Stain and poly are their own punishment.
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That *may* be a valid criticism of Minwax *stains*, but I've had nothing but great results from the wipe-on poly. I tried it as an experiment about 8 or 8 years ago, figuring it couldn't be as good as the General Finishes poly at Woodcraft. It's not. It's better. It dries faster *and* harder, but the best part is that it comes in a bottle, not a can -- a bottle you can pour from. I pour about an ounce into an empty prescription bottle to use on the project, and reseal the varnish bottle immediately. So the varnish lasts a lot longer in the bottle because it's not exposed to oxygen.
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On 7/4/2012 3:21 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

I have no problem with Minwax products and use their stains in most all construction and remodel projects, including entire kitchens, but not usually on furniture projects.
That said, just went through 2 quarts of Minwax Red Mahagony #225 at a client's request on this (no topcoat yet):
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5761467891170259858
That client is a two hour drive from the shop, and because Minwax is available just about anywhere, made it easy for her to chose a stain she liked without my participation.
My paint contractor uses it almost exclusively and generally adds a toner to the top coat of where shading is desired to match floors, countertop, etc, and, depending upon the wood, in an effort to blend the old and new, both situations faced here:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5761466760456472354
Not ashamed to use the product in the least ... :)
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A little unusual for it to have two drawers on the right and one on the left? It affects the symmetry. Can I guess it was so it would fit aesthetically in a specific area?
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On 7/4/2012 7:50 PM, Dave wrote:

Yes, most unusual; not exactly easy to fabricate; took unusual methods to do so; will indeed go in a very specific corner; made for two; must hold large Apple monitors; one desk space required a minimum of 31" wide leg room; drawers and doors placed _exactly_ as the client specified.
Basically designed with the same principle of a band wanting each individual instrument louder than every other instrument in the monitor mix. :(
... none of it my call, I just build what they want.
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5761467891170259858
Nice! How long did that take to build?
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On 7/4/2012 3:21 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

My problem has always been that there has always been an area that would absorb the stain. It could not be as bad as I think it is, ;~), I have seen a lot of good work done with it.
Oddly I have resanded the whole section to bare wood and it had absorption problems again. Resanded again and used another product and no problem. This has happened to me more than once. Something odd going on there.
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