Milwaukee 5625 Router

I'm wondering if anybody has experience with this router in a router table using the T handle to adjust height rather than a router lift mechanism. There's a really negative review on Amazon referring to a split nut that has failed. Other reviews are positive. If this mechanism is really a problem, I'll go with a lift mechanism but I really like the specs of the 5625 including a speed control for large diameter bits. Also, it's not clear to me but does a 1/4" collet come with it?
The use is for general purpose routing in furniture building. Mostly hardwoods but not exclusively.
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All of the up/down integrated adjusters are sloppy and yield satisfactory but not accurate depth changes. This holds true whether the router is upside down or right side (as designed). Milwaukee 5625/15 etc. are no better or worse than the competition. Their 1/2 nut is quick to release and their acme drive screw is fast, rough & sloppy. If the depth of cut is critical you might consider a lift but you're only trading adversities. You still have to manage the east/west of depth of cut, ad infinitum. ******************************* http://patwarner.com ************Routers*************
On Nov 21, 9:41 am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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I've abut decided on the Milwaukee as the router for Norm's station but haven't found a pre drilled table insert for it. So, I'll go with a blank insert and drill to suit. I've found a variety of blanks and wonder if one is better than another.
Any thoughts will be helpful.
Thanks in advance.
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I used phenolic for a table I built prior to the Norm style that I recently completed. I'm using the aluminum plates from Rockler now. (I have 2 plates, one for the Milwaukee 5625 and one for a Hitachi M12V.) Works well for me.
Max
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On Tue, 11 Dec 2007 06:02:14 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Maybe you can consider buying a Benchdog plate (http://www.benchdog.com/proplate.htm ). I have one made out of aluminum and it's great... especially with a heavy router like the Milwaukee.
Ben
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I have that router and am well pleased with it. I have read the reviews at Amazon. If I may make the observation, it seems with a lot of the reviews on many of the products, problems stem in many cases from operator error. I even chuckle at some of the comments. I have not had any problems with the switch but I use an auxiliary switch on the table. The "split nut" is indeed plastic but I suspect that users who have had trouble with it have abused it. ("dropping" the motor into the base, etc) Since I don't operate a production shop where time is of the essence, I take a little better care of tools. The 1/4" collet did *not* come with the router. It was $20.00 extra. (from Amazon)
Max
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wrote:

I've often read reviews on Amazon and wondered if the writer had actually read the manual for the tool. The 5625 router reviews don't look that out there, compared to some Amazon reviews I've seen.
Off the top of my memory: - The guy who said it was the fault of his new Forrest WWII that he got kick back with 1/4" pine - The guy who couldn't keep a Flexeel hose from tangling around his feet. - The guy who complained that a Fuji spray gun replacement parts kit only fit Fuji spray guns, and not other brands.
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"Bonehenge (B A R R Y)" wrote

LOL, Yup, that's what I mean.
Max
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Boy, for use on furniture I would no want to rely on the less-accurate adjustment on any router. The router lifts are well worth the expenditure. Regarding the 'reviews', you have to take some with a grain of salt because they are not reasonable or if they read too much like a rant rather than a statement of fact. I also don't get too concerned when there is only one complaint about a particular fault. I take them as a whole and average it out.
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wrote:

For a plunge router, that may be true, and lifts may be worth the money for many reasons. My table uses a straight base, as opposed to a plunge base, and I have yet to see a situation where the adjustment wasn't plenty accurate for nice furniture.
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On Nov 21, 12:41 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I have 3 Milwaukee routers. I work them to death on solid surface countertop production but only in those areas where precise work needs to be done. The bull-work I hand to the Hitachi MV12's which do NOT want to break down. The 5625 is head and shoulders above the current rash of Porter Cable 'production' routers. You can't go wrong buying a Milwaukee router. The bulk of my tools are Milwaukee red, but there's are a few black/lime green pieces around too.
If I had to buy just ONE router, it would be the 2000 watt Festool. but it would be a crying shame to banish that to router-table duty. I think the big bubbly Triton would be a good value for that job.
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