Metric

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a snorlaxian?
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

Many places in engineering you care about the mass, not the weight--most fluid dynamic calculations for example require knowing the density of the fluid in mass/volume.
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On 09/09/2009 12:07 PM, David Nebenzahl wrote:

Try and stop a submarine at flank speed and you'll care a lot about mass vs weight.
Ditto figuring out the acceleration of a blimp.
Chris
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Both are things I have to be concerned about every day.
Luigi
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Weight the submarine before it leaves dry dock.

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David Nebenzahl wrote:
<snip>

The Snorlaxian Labor Union! ;-)
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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And you can't hold your liquor so you have to have your beer in smaller pints. :-)
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How could I forget RCHs???? That is the only relevant and important measurement in wooddorking. The rest just has to fit, how long or wide or deep doesn't need to be expressed in any kind of system.
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Two systems there too. R = Red or R= Royal.
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Luigi Zanasi wrote:

My hat's off to the man who first discovered that a RCH could be used as a system of measurement. I'd like to shake his hand (after he washes it first).
--
Repeat after me:
"I am we Todd it. I am sofa king we Todd it."
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On 9/9/2009 9:58 AM Steve Turner spake thus:

>

Please pardon my ignorance: what's an RCH? All Google gives is "Recognised Clearing Houses" (using define:rch).
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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Heh heh....
I almost got caught, too. Try googling for rch unit of measure. ;)
nb
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On 9/9/2009 11:12 AM notbob spake thus:

Gotcha.
OK, new question: how big is an RCH? (Sorry if this has been covered here before ad nasueam.)
I read one comment on a web page[1] that claimed it was 1/200" (OK, for those who prefer fake units of measurement, that's 0.127mm).
[1] http://www.neatorama.com/2009/01/30/fun-and-unusual-units-of-measurements , which has interesting units like the "jerk" and the "sagan".
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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The point is that a RCH is not convertible into other units. It's an RCH.
Luigi
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On 9/9/2009 5:44 PM Luigi Zanasi spake thus:
>

Ah, sui generis. I see.
Now I just need to find me one ...
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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On Wed, 09 Sep 2009 17:56:51 -0700, David Nebenzahl

Betcha can't eat just one.
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On 9/9/2009 11:10 AM David Nebenzahl spake thus:

Aaargh; never mind. Wikipedia provided the answer. (I guess it's good for *something* after all.)
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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Except that the french, being french, got it wrong as usual. It was supposed to be but they measured it incorrectly!
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I thought it was along the equator, not a meridian. The equatorial circumference being a lot bigger that the pole-to-pole one. I suppose I could look it up...but who really, really cares?
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Here are the main arguments for both sides of the debate:
PRO IMPERIAL: There is absolutely no question; traditional imperial measurements are far superior for woodworking. Most wreckers use it for very good reasons:
PRO METRIC: There is absolutely no question; metric measurements are far superior for woodworking. Most woodworkers in the world use it for very good reasons:
Intuitiveness: 1. Imperial is much more intuitive and natural. Feet and inches (thumbs) have been used throughout human history as they are related to human body parts (fingers and feet). As Michelangelo said: man is the measure of all things. 1. Metric is much more intuitive and natural. Humans always use a base 10 system as it is related to human body parts (number of fingers & toes). As Michelangelo said: man is the measure of all things.
Communicating measurements: 2. Imperial is easier to hear and leads to less confusion. Someone calls out a measurement for a piece of wood, & before you notice it, you cut 10mm instead of 10cm. 2. Metric is easier to hear and leads to less confusion. Quickly now, is 19/32" bigger or smaller than 5/8"? On the other hand, it is immediately obvious that 15mm is smaller than 16mm.
Ease of learning: 3. Imperial measurements are easier to learn. You don't have to memorize all those crazy prefixes: femto, nano, micro, milli, centi, deci, deka, hecto, kilo, mega, myria, giga, etc. 3. Metric measurements are easier to learn. You don't have to remember all those crazy measures like inches, hands, feet, cubits, yards, fathoms, rods, cones, chains, furlongs, cables, miles, etc.
Arithmetic: 4. Imperial uses simple fractional arithmetic which we all learned in grade school. Not like metric where you need to know all those prefixes and can easily make a mistake on your calculator & cut something 10 times too big or 10 times too small. 4. Metric uses simple decimal arithmetic where you can use your calculator directly without springing big bucks for one that calculates inches and fractions.
Division: 5. It's a lot easier to divide stuff in imperial measurements. What do you call half a millimeter? Ever try to divide 304.8mm by four? A foot is real easy - 12" divided by four is 3". 5. It's a lot easier to divide stuff in metric measurements. Ever try to divide 39 9/16 inches by four? While 1000mm divided by four readily gives 250mm.
Accuracy: 6. Imperial is more accurate. You can easily go to 1/32 which is more precise than 1mm. 6. Metric is more accurate. You can easily go to 0.5mm which is more precise than 1/32"
The REAL Reason: 7. Metric is a stupid cowardly French system. You don't want to support those smelly unwashed arrogant ingrates, do you? GOD BLESS AMERICA! 7. Inches and feet are a stupid warmongering American imperialist system. The rest of the world and all scientists use the much more rational metric system. It's about time the US gets into the 19th century, never mind the 21st! VIVE LA FRANCE!
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