Measure without tape measure.

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Ahhh... Power tool bulb replacement!
The cap was probably designed when bulbs were replace by removing the lens cover.
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Reminds me of the vehicle from the 70's where you had to tilt the engine up to remove one of the sparkplugs. This was back when tune-ups were a common preventative maintainence. A typical case of the design engineers not getting the maintenance folks involved earlier enough. No one asked "Hey, guys, if we build it like this, can you fix it when it breaks?"
It took some backyard mechanic to figure out that if you drilled a large hole in the wheel well, you could get to the spark plug, Mechanics would use a hole saw, then install a sheet metal plug to seal the access hole.
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IIRC, the Chevy Monza ( late 70's) with a 307(?) had a few issues like that. The hole in the inside fender was the only way to go.
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Robatoy wrote:

Late sixties (like '68, '69, ...) Charger w/ 383 or larger CID.
But, nothing then was even close to the nightmare of the modern transverse engine jobbies w/ smaller frames to cut down weight...look into how to replace a battery on a modern Chrysler 300M or similar... :(
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Were they hard to change in Mopars? We had a 67 Monaco with a 383, a 70 Fury with a 383, a 75 Gran Fury with a 440 and a 72 Polara with a 440. I don't recall swearing over spark plugs but my Dad was the son of a minister. I was a kid who was not in charge of spark plug changing. Maybe taking the garbage cans to the street and shoveling snow. I do recall it being tight but do-able unlike the infamous Monza spark plugs.
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Ever work on a Ford van with a big block?
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No, I haven't. THAT is one temptation I have succussfully fought off. I have WANTED to......
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wrote:

One of my PA hauling trucks was a 460 powered ex-Penske 14.5' Ford Hi-cube. These vehicles were famous for (6) plug spark plug replacements! You COULD NOT get to the middle of the engine! At least the 351W power trucks could be serviced! However, the 460 Ford would pass anything but a gas station... 3-4 MPG, empty or loaded!
My other trucks were ex-Ryder rental 22' and 24' bodied GMC 7000 and Chevy C70, 366 V8 powered (ceramic clutch and all!) trucks that were amazingly easy to service. Ryder would sell off their 4 year olds, paint 'em whatever color you wanted and give a 1 year warranty.
I also had a twin-screw 28' Top Kick, but it was a diesel, so the maintenance was much different.
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- Ever work on a Ford van with a big block?
No, but the block I lived on in NYC had a perimeter of 2 miles and I worked on my lay-down Rambler a lot.
OH! You meant a big block *engine*. Sorry.
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I had one of those Monza's with the small block. I think it was actually a 262, not the 307. I changed that plug once. Never again. It was pretty old when I was driving it and I ALWAYS kept a tool box in the trunk - and I regularly drove it 550 mile to and from college. Nowaday's I suppose that would be pointless - not too many things you can repair roadside - and probably not a lot of college kids who've grown up working on cars. I work with a couple of younger engineers, and it's always surprising that they call a plumber or electrician for the simplest home repair. Hell, I would always at least attempt it first, and then make a call if I really screwed it up.
Rich

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Robatoy wrote:

Chrysler Newport with a 383 was unlikely to have ever had plug #3 changed. Needed a double articulating wrench handle.
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wrote:

The official procedure for changing the back three spark plugs on my 2000 Astro is to unbolt the body from the frame and jack it up about 3 inches. There is evidently a "dealer only" tool that will do the job without that, but I kind of doubt it, there just isn't room to get the plug out even if you could get a tool in.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Definition of a teenager: God's punishment for enjoying sex.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

That was the AMC Pacer and the real problem was that it was designed for a Wankel engine that didn't happen, but by the time it was realized that the Wankel wasn't going to happen it was too late in the design cycle to fix the problem.

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As the the fictional Lazerus Long said (Robert A. Heinlein):
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly.
Specialization is for insects.
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3 man and 1 woman were talking about this on CNN the other day...just the Top 10.
re: Use a torque wrench - None of them had any idea what a torque wrench was. re: Fix a dead outlet - One guy commented - "Oh yeah...a great way to burn the house down!"
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Electrical work is being mystified and mythified out of the realm of home owners. Yes, you can burn your house down with an electrical fire. That doesn't mean you have to live with a bad switch (more of a fire hazard) that you don't want to pay an electrician $50 to come out and replace. (This is the way it usually happens.)
People are scared because of all the fools out there that don't take the time to learn how something's supposed to be done and plan it all out.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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Puckdropper wrote:

Thats because they spend 16 years of school learning English and not one hour teaching them how to safely fix a light switch, or a leaky faucet, or how to change a flat, or how to paint a house or anything much useful. I might add most/many Americans could speak english about as good the first day they walked into school as when they left 12/16 years later.
I was looking at a house for my son to rent his senior year at college and asked one of the kids moving out if he had a job lined up. He said no, he was going to continue his education. I said you would think after 16 years of school, and a TON of money for college he would have finally been ready for employment... He said they mainly taught him how to study.... 16 years of school and so far all he learned was how to study.... go figure!
--
Jack
http://jbstein.com
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Jack Stein wrote:

There are plenty of occupations where 4 years of college is not enough.
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B A R R Y wrote:

The interesting thing is after 16 years of education all he has learned is how to learn. Probably still can't fix a leaky faucet, replace a light switch, or any other myriad of things a rounded person should be able to do in every day life, let alone a marketable skill. I can't think of anything useful that should take 16 years of study before actually doing something, including brain surgery.
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Jack
http://jbstein.com
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wrote:

So, you can do brain surgery? How about a root canal?
Can you write an airtight big-business contract or litigate?
Can you formulate and run a pharmaceutical research study?
Can you teach future physicists?
I fly and bicycle with folks who have job titles like "professor", "doctor", "scientist", and "attorney", and all of them needed more than 16 years of school to do what they do. I also don't think any of them pulls in less than $250,000 / year, so I'll bet they can get that outlet replaced. <G>
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