Matching the grain of the fronts of the two overlaid drawers with the rail

I'm working on my first drawer(s) and would really like to match the grain as best as possible with the rail.
Attached is a link to a pic with exactly the look I'm going for.
http://www.newyankee.com/Yankees/ohjimreutener.jpg
I'd sure love to know how you get the look.
Thanks! Jim Bates
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The apron parts and drawer fronts are cut from the same board. If you can't visualize how to do that, then just look for two identical tree's....
Bob S.

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Ah, yes. 2 identical tree patterns! :)
If I can't find 2 identical trees, what do you suggest as the best method or cutting the drawer from the rail? I'd really like to be able to have a drawer face that would be rabbeted to the drawer sides with a small 3/8" overlap in from of the rail. I hope I'm describing it with enough detail.
Jim

grain
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On Mon, 28 Jun 2004 14:42:49 -0400, "Jim Bates"

you'll have to do that with a couple of bookmatched boards.
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The apron was cut from a single piece of wood. The task for you is to cut those drawer slots out without wrecking the pattern. This can be done probably several different ways. (1) Jig saw (2) Rip and glue apron back together leaving hole for drawers. (3) Buy a snazzy scrollsaw that cuts a VERY fine kerf.
My personal favorite is (2) with a thin kerf blade.
Jim Bates wrote:

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Just saw something like this again on the WoodWorks show. The drawer front is cut from the same stock as the apron. Two rips slice the stock, then two cross cuts to cut out the drawer front. Glue pieces back together - sans door front piece. The project on TV was a flush front drawer, but I'd imagine the technique is similar.
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patrick conroy wrote:

Flush faced/inset drawer faces could be done with the two rip cuts/ two cross cuts per drawer - thin kerf blade of course - bandsaw maybe even better. But it's the overlap on the drawer face(s) that makes things more complicated.
You could resaw the drawer faces down to make 1/8 inch "thick veneer, glue them to an oversized piece of the same type of wood and chamfer the edges to semi-hide the transistion to the back board. Centering you're "veneer" pieces could be a little tricky but can be done. I suspect that's what they did for the piece you provided the url for +--+ / | ++ | | | | | | | | | | | | | ++ | \ | +--+
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Overlay is the problem. If you lack the tools for resawing a veneer and/or pressing it to another piece of stock, you might be able to spoof it in another way...
Cut the drawer face out of the single board using your method of choice. This will get you to the point where making a flush drawer would be easy.
To get the overlay, use another piece of stock that is similar and "fill in the hole" Basically, cut 1/2" strips that you edge glue (with bicuits, splines, or dowels) into the drawer "holes" to make the holes smaller and produce your support for the overlay. (I hope I am describing this well)
The grain matching will not be a concern because when the drawer is closed it will cover up the added material.
Of course, the veneer method would definitely be a more professional look.
Just a thought,
Jay
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"Jim Bates" wrote in message

Take a look at my website projects journal, Page 4, "kitchen side table" for one method. Although it does not describe overlay drawer fronts, the concept is the same.
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Last update: 5/15/04
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You can cut that front with two rip cuts, four crosscuts from a single board As long as the grain pattern doesn't run diagonally across the board, the drawer front, the center and end offcuts, and upper and lower rails will grain match fairly well.
Howie

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