Makita 18v 1/2 Hammer Drill - Heads-up

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Might want to check this out. Don't know how long this will last, and it may in only certain areas but it is an excellent price for those looking for another drill, battery and charger:
http://m.homedepot.com/p/Makita-18-Volt-LXT-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-1-2-in-Hammer-Driver-Drill-Kit-XPH012/205382798/
Normally the price for the tool only. Ordered it online yesterday for store pickup, so I don't know if you can walk in and get the same price.
I've been happy with my matching Makita drill and impact driver for a few years now, so this makes a trio in the drill arsenal.
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Looks like Amazon's got the same thing. $99.
The battery & charger will easily run $99 (replacement chargers are expensive), so if you need those this is the way to go. That's the 3.0 aH battery, btw.
Puckdropper
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On 11/22/2014 1:32 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

I see it now at $25 off the $100 price this month. Martin (on Amazon)
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On 22 Nov 2014 19:32:59 GMT, Puckdropper

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(Amazon.com product link shortened) Drill/dp/B00N9ULIAE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid16770496&sr=8-1 &keywords=XPH012
This listing? It's not eligible for that promotion.
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Karl - have you used this drill yet? They have the same one now at HD as p art of their Christmas promotions. It has a case, one battery, and the sam e drill and charger.
I was wondering if you could turn off the "hammer" capability and use it as a heavy duty driver. If you could, that would be a "no brainer" for me. Yes? No?
I use a hammer drill these days to drill deep 1/4" holes for tap in anchors to secure plate, plywood furring strips, etc. Almost all holes I drill in masonry ae 1/4, usually no more than 3/8". The hardest thing that drill w ould do as a hammer drill is when I am installing new thresholds on existin g doors into really old concrete. Reading the specs on that drill, I think it would suit my needs with plenty left over.
Your thoughts?
Robert
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On 11/24/2014 6:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yep, as Morgans said, the hammer function is optional, with the usual ring selector for rotation only, rotation with clutch, rotation with hammer.

Used it with a tapcon bit yesterday to do just that. Worked just fine, although I usually go to a tailed drill for that function if I were drilling more than a few holes.
This is an XLT that matches my current XLTs; a drill/driver, and impact driver, that Ive had for about five years. I've used Makita cordless drills for over 30 years and have never been dissatisfied with a single one to date.
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On Wednesday, November 26, 2014 5:41:15 AM UTC-6, Swingman wrote:



I usually wear out a good cordless drill about every three years. At this point, my drills get used more than my saws or anything else I use. I seem to drill and screw everything these days since I do so much maintenance an d repair work. I settled on DeWalt as I could buy an upper end drill and i t would make all 36 months. Then the drive train collapses or the motor qu its, but I figure I got my money's worth out of it.
I have a Makita that I won in a contractor's raffle about 15 - 18 years ago I can't kill. Carbide inserts on the chuck, helical cut (not cast and no plastic) gears in the drive train, and some kind of unkillable motor. It s till runs great and will drill/drive circles around anything I have ever ow ned. But the damn thing weighs as much as two other drills and is HUGE. I t's only a 14v, but as I said, it will out work any drill I have ever owned . If this Makita is from the lineage I will be using it as much as a heavy duty driver as I will a drill. It seems pretty compact and light weight.
Thanks Karl, and thanks Morgans for the "heads up".
Robert
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On 11/26/2014 10:03 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A heads up on the Makita products. It was explained to me that the blue/green Makita are the more HD line of Makita tools. The White Makita products are the home owner grade.
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Yes, hammer is on or off, optional.
wrote in message
Karl - have you used this drill yet? They have the same one now at HD as part of their Christmas promotions. It has a case, one battery, and the same drill and charger.
I was wondering if you could turn off the "hammer" capability and use it as a heavy duty driver. If you could, that would be a "no brainer" for me. Yes? No?
I use a hammer drill these days to drill deep 1/4" holes for tap in anchors to secure plate, plywood furring strips, etc. Almost all holes I drill in masonry ae 1/4, usually no more than 3/8". The hardest thing that drill would do as a hammer drill is when I am installing new thresholds on existing doors into really old concrete. Reading the specs on that drill, I think it would suit my needs with plenty left over.
Your thoughts?
Robert
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I would also add that IMHO, the Makita of today is not nearly as tough as the Makita of 15 years ago. Like half as tough.
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On 11/27/2014 4:02 AM, Morgans wrote:

Tough enough to be cost effective, which rules in business use ... then and now.
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On Thursday, November 27, 2014 7:54:44 AM UTC-6, Swingman wrote:


Spot on, Karl. I like to buy enough to do the job and then a bit extra, no more. Tools break, they get stolen, they wear out, manufacturers stop sup porting certain models, tecnologies change, better stuff comes out, and tha t great tool you bought that got 5 star ratings all around turns out to be a POS.
I have noticed that it is homeowners and hobby guys that have huge requirem ents of their tools and what they expect of them, not professionals. They dote on battery power, rugged build, the ability to take a beating, and POW ER.
It is awful for them to see my guys in action using tools that are mismatch ed, in different stages of their lives, and worse, how much we all pride li ghtweight tools that are easily replaced or repairs.
In four decades of on site work, I have never seen a Festool product. I ha ve never seen a Metabo product. I have never seen Lamillo product. I have seen one Fein oscillating tool, owned by my coutertop guy. I never see th e high powered monster tools that they tout in the wood/tool magazines or o nline blogs. Just a mish mash of tools that get it done.
Robert
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On 11/29/2014 1:27 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Why buy an 18V drill when I can get a 36v that weighs only 20 pounds? I have four 2" screw to drive today so I need that power.
One reason I like my Panasonic 15.6v so much is the weight Face it, for most of us hobbyist a 12 volt drill driver will get the job done building a bookcase or box, but tools are no different than any other hobby products. The best golf clubs, stereo equipment, cameras, kitchen equipment, etc. Many of us are buying the spec sheet no matter how poor the actual value of the product may be.
Don't forget, you need the right logo on your shirts too!
OTOH, a nice plane is a pleasure to use.
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On Saturday, November 29, 2014 8:44:54 AM UTC-6, Ed Pawlowski wrote:





I bought a 2 drill combo a couple of years ago when I had to pull a million hinges and relocate a similar hinge on the doors after refinishing. It wa s a little 12V combo that came with 2 batteries. I was really surprised at how much use I have got then and continue to get from that set. I pulled all the screws to prep the doors, drilled new pilot holes for new screws an d then drove in the little 5/8" hinge screws. Like the little drills enoug h that I used them to replace the drawer slides, add sliding baskets in the lowers, and then add the pull and knob hardware.
Testing it out, I found when new the little 12V drill would drill about 240 pilot holes for the hinge screws into white oak. Wow! I didn't pay atten tion to how many hinge screws it would drive as the drill just kept on goin g.
What I really like is the small size. On a retrofit it is easy to get a dr awer slide cockeyed, or worse, one that actually needs to be cockeyed. I c an get one of these drills inside the cabinet fairly easily and loosen, the n tighten the adjustments as needed.
I don't have anything against big brand, very expensive tools. Sadly, few of them have any real value to me. Worse, the folks I see that buy them ge t so little use out of them it is a shame.
Two exceptions would be Karl and his Festool track saw. After seeing the s uper clean, accurate cuts Karl made when breaking down his sheet goods for cabinets he was building, I have been looking for an excuse to get one. No kidding, with planning you could build cabinets with the quality and accur acy of the end product.
The other would be Leon and his might Domino. Having seen all he uses he h as found for that machine, he has truly shown what that tool can do. I wou ldn't be surprised if Leon has fixed a flat or two with his machine. I kno w he uses it to make salsa! Having installed thousands of Dominoes, he get s his use out of it.
Thinking while I am typing, those really are the only two guys I know that have put premium tools to work, guys that use them for constant work like t hey were designed to do. A couple of years go I tried like heck to get a g uy I know to sell me his Domino machine. No dice. He probably hasn't cut more than a hundred (if that) Dominoes with it, but he feels like it gives him some serious cabinet making credentials just to have it. And so it sit s. Along with his Festool 12V drill that he saw Silva using on This Old Ho use.
For him, they are great for bragging rights and paper weights.
Robert
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On 11/30/2014 5:28 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

LOL,,, If I were in your shoes I would not have a majority of the Festool tools that I have. It is true about working on a job site, you dont want just anyone using the expensive stuff. I have the track saw too. It is the first tool that cuts into a sheet of plywood. I no longer need help to cut a full sheet on the TS.
I will say that the T15-3 drill combo was an indulgence, Christmas present from my wife. Has it paid for it self, hard to say. But for the last 3 years it HAS replaced my 12 volt Makita Impact driver and drill. I was helping a couple of friends install a sliding barn door door separating the bedroom from master bath. This drill ran circles around the Dewalt 18 volt drill that one of them had. It would not drive the 3/8" lag screws but the 15 volt Festool did with no issue and at a controlled steady pace. The right angle adapter has been used countless times, I used it yesterday to remove and replace close out panels under the front end of my wife's car. The car sits way too low to the ground to simply use the drill pointed straight up and down. It has also been handy for putting wood screws in tight spots on many occasions. ;~)
The Domino.....I am on my 3rd replacement box of Domino's Each box holds 1800 and each of those typically requires 2 plunges in the mating pieces. I wonder how many plunges the machine is rated for.... I am still using the original 5mm bit and it seems to be doing fine.
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On 11/29/2014 12:27 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Well there sonny boy. You have never been on site with Karl or I. LOL
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On 11/29/2014 2:25 PM, Leon wrote:

For those of y'all wondering, this is what Leon looks like on site:
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/WXTySi_uN1Tz5jpe7kpdttMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink
That heavy duty Festool hat he wears cost so much it pushed his head down between his shoulder blades.
(Note the Festool box cardboard being used to protect the floor ... only the finest...)
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And a lot of the uber-hyped, uber-priced stuff definitely is not, and every time you use it you worry about damaging the finish on it's polished handle etc. I call them " Boutique Tools" Some call them "compensation"
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On Sun, 30 Nov 2014 03:28:20 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

To be honest, I'm likely close to being in that category too. But, and it's a big BUT, I like using the Domino. And, to be honest, what it does and how easily it does it, makes me want to do woodworking projects. I've had a biscuit joiner and I've had a decent dowelling jig. In the end, they just don't measure up in any category to the Domino. Well, that's not completely true, they certainly do measure up in the cost category. But, that's a whisper in the wind when it comes to capability.
Anyway, I'm not married, I don't have a car and I live in an apartment. I've got to spend my money on something. So, if it's toys like the Domino that get my attention, then so be it. :)
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