Make a bandsaw template jig

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Let me know your thoughts on this:
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/video.php?videop
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On 1/19/2013 11:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Could only see the opening screen (router writing Garage Woodworks). Probably my setup as I have a new computer. Yuck!
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On 1/19/2013 10:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

Well done, Brian. I do a good deal of pattern routing of curves in rails, trim following curves, chair legs, etc., and occasionally have problems with grain direction and figure that can ruin a piece of stock very quickly when routing to a pattern ... often when lea$t expected.
This looks like an easily effected solution for those situations.
I also like the idea that it allows my tapering jig, similar to the one you are using, to do double duty ... half way there already to a working solution. :)
And, as long as you're using a bandsaw to rough cut the parts before pattern routing, you might has well cut out that last, sometimes problematic, routing step altogether.
This will be very useful for my purposes, IMO.
Thanks!
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On Sunday, January 20, 2013 10:34:35 AM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

I got the idea from a book I have and added the tapering jig to make the operation easier. I was surprised how well it works. I thought the blade might have a tendency to move out of the notch and cut the template, but this didn't happen. Worked great.
As I'm sure you are aware, it's not going to leave as smooth a cut as a router, but as you mentioned, there are advantages to this method over a router. It can also handle thicker pieces that most pattern bits would not be able to handle.

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On 1/20/2013 9:45 AM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

router, but as you mentioned, there are advantages to this method over a router. It can also handle thicker pieces that most pattern bits would not be able to handle.
What about an adaptation/design for doing this:
I generally cut curved chair rails out on the bandsaw, then have to sand them by hand to final form, which can be a problem making them identical ... and, when there is jig of some type in the following production steps, like drilling angled mortises in the CBR's, _identical_ is of utmost importance.
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5819638318036909666
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5819638374010507218
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5820039893552073442
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5820076950437630034
Possibly make it more like a pin router setup?
Just thinking out loud ...
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On Sunday, January 20, 2013 11:05:41 AM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

router, but as you mentioned, there are advantages to this method over a router. It can also handle thicker pieces that most pattern bits would not be able to handle.

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5819638318036909666
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5819638374010507218
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5820039893552073442
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5820076950437630034
Should work on those rails. Getting it clamped in the tapering jig after one side has already been cut might be a little challenging - but certainly not impossible. Might need toggle clamps w/ a long reach or develop another way to clamp it down.
Not sure how you'd make it more like a pin router (having just looked up what a pin router is). I've not come across those before. Now you've got me thinking how I can make my own pin router. Thanks a lot :)
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Swingman wrote:

Drum sander with a bearing guiding on a template.
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On 1/20/2013 12:14 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Having tried "sanding drum", and home made "offset templates" for an oscillating spindle sander, IME they aren't well suited to roughed out blanks, as they bring in another set of problems of their own ... less precision, marks and flat spots.
A band saw solution for accurate, repeatable template cutting, is what is intriguing to me ... a bit of finish sanding is expected ... but that is all the _sanding_ I care to ever do if I can help it. :)
I asked because the inside curve in the specific application is somewhat of a fly in the ointment for the jig as it is shown in the video ... one that calls for some of Brian's brainy adaptation skills with regard to a _band saw jig_ ... and his jig acumen in general.
IOW, trying to pick the lad's brain ... :)
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On 01/20/2013 12:06 PM, Swingman wrote:

I'd think complementary convex and concave templates would do it. You want to have the "keeper" on the template so as not to undercut and probably do the concave cut first.
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On 1/20/2013 1:27 PM, Doug Winterburn wrote:

Which would call for a better way to secure jig from moving forward and back than the magnetic feather boards, which would appear to get in the way of an inside curve/concave cut.
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On 1/20/2013 1:50 PM, Swingman wrote:

A triangular shaped jig, with business end at the apex and the base having two points that could be secured in the miter slot, instead of one?
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On Sunday, January 20, 2013 3:00:39 PM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

Ha! I like that idea. A split miter bar that could be expanded from above to lock it in place perhaps. Hmmmmm.

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On 1/20/2013 3:49 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

There is little in the physical world more resistant to forces than three symmetrical points, joined linearly on the circumference of a circle, resulting a rigid frame... a fundamental engineering principle. :)
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On 1/20/2013 5:16 PM, Swingman wrote:

What about DuctDuck Tape?
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On 1/20/2013 6:19 PM, Leon wrote:

Yep ... and, according to the Internet, a triangle made of duct tape is more powerful than Stephen Hawking's mind.
Uh, bwan Jyour ...
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On 1/20/2013 1:50 PM, Swingman wrote:

Simple solution, Split the rail that fits in the miter slot and use a flat top/counter sing washer in that rail. As you tighten the top knob the screw expands the split rail and the rail tightens in the slot.
I have a feather board that uses that method of staying put in the miter slot.
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On 1/20/2013 2:57 PM, Leon wrote:

Crap, Use a flat top counter sink screw in that rail.
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On Sunday, January 20, 2013 3:57:59 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

I just posted the same solution. I really should read all the replies first.
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On 1/20/2013 3:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

LOL. Oh heck no. Post ASAP, the information is vital! There is the possibility you or I may not have been beat to the punch.
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On Sun, 20 Jan 2013 13:52:09 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@garagewoodworks.com wrote:

I think you've come up with a great solution Brian. Should have got your patent before you told us. 8-)
Mike M
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