Lumber dimensioning - which do you do?


I plan to make cabinet doors out of some 4/4 lumber that I have . The panel doors will be 3/4" when finished. My question is: to what dimension should I plane and join the boards initially? Should I plane the lumber to the finished 3/4" and then glue up the panels? In the past I have left a little extra, i.e. 7/8", glued up the panels, and then planed them down to the finished 3/4" dimension. This made a real smooth joint where the pieces were glued together. But I wonder if I am wasting time planing twice?
What do you do?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Face joint edge joint glue plane edge joint (if I no longer have an exterior jointed edge) rip
If panels are > planer capacity, I make <12" subassemblies as above, then glue.
-Steve

panel
should
little
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good idea! Don't bother planing until after glue up. That'll save a step.
Thanks, Gary

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gary in Virginia wrote:

...
Yes...for large panels I normally only knock off just enough of the roughsawn surface to select stock and do the glue up w/ incompletely finished stock. I don't even think of final thicknessing at that point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I make the frames as thick as they will go. Normally that's around 7/8 after straightening and planing. Panels can be, and often are less than 3/4. Since they're glue-ups, it's a great place for the boards with wane removed to be matched, or for under thickness dog boards.
I use hand planes after the glue-ups, but with Bessey clamps and a good jointer, there's seldom much to do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 Oct 2005 16:46:18 GMT, "Gary in Virginia"

it kind of depends on what equipment you have. if your thickness planer or sander is wide enough to take the whole panel, do the glueup as thick as you can. this gives you bigger faces being glued, which is more forgiving of alignment errors and easier to clamp up straight. if the panel won't fit through your machine, do subassemblies that will, get the thickness as close as you are comfortable with and finish by hand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.