looking for a plywood/lumber hauling trailer

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snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net says...

An 8 foot bed is a 300 buck option on an F150. No need for an "F250 superduty diesel".
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"J. Clarke" wrote

I find that amazing.
The eight foot bed should be the standard. After all, many building materials come in 8 foot or longer lengths and many sheet good are 4 X 8.
I see so many truck out there that have extended cabs, leather seats, super stereo systems, custom wheels and absolutely shiny, blinding paint. Remember, way back when, trucks were actually used to do some honest work?
I had a jeep pickup for many years. It had a seven foot bed. It was OK. But many times I missed that 8 foot bed I had on previous trucks. And when I buy another truck, it will definitely have an eight foot bed. And it will actually be used to do some work.
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Lee Michaels <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

I sure do, and plenty of dishonest work as well!
--
There are no stupid questions, but there are lots of stupid answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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The poster said "decent" pickup. :-)
Max (an F-150 is almost decent) :-)
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snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net says...

One hopes that it's better than my Dad's F-100 that hauled plywood for 20 years (and for all I know is still hauling it--he died 20 years ago and willed it to his best friend, who died a month later, so I have no idea where it is now).
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Off topic but I believe some will find it interesting: My grandfather was a paperhanger and lived in a very urban South Philadelphia neighborhood. He never owned a car or truck of his own. Mostly worked right in his own neighborhood. I do remember though, that sometimes he and his partner would take a bus or trolley (As they called streetcars in Philly) to a job. They would take a ladder by holding it outside the bus through the windows, one sitting several rows back from the other. One would get on the bus, the other would hand him one end of the ladder, then get on the bus himself. The first would lift up the ladder from his end so the partner could grab the other end. These were wooden ladders too, aluminum was not common yet. People just don't work that way an more. (And it's a good thing they don't, many would say!)
--
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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A utility trailer will outlast many, many tow vehicles. So many that the long-term cost will be negligible. Plus, you'll still have it to pass on to the grandkids. If the OP's SUV has a step bumper or a hitch receiver, the cost of a hitch is only a few bucks, and the wiring can be easily done yourself for the price of a connector.
I use mine all the time. Pick up a major sppliance and take the old one to the dump -- saves the delivery charge, plus I do it when it's convenient for me. Pick up free firewood after a wind storm -- save money. I even take it hunting in case I ever get a deer (Could happen!)
I'd be lost without mine.
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