Little info on my bandsaw.

Have a Craftsman Tilt bandsaw. Table does not tilt the saw blade and drive wheels tilt. OK that is great. The pot metal casting that holds the guides and back pressure bearing has a threaded hole that a set screw tightens the shaft for the bearing. Threads stripped. I disassembled and removed all parts. Cleaned with lacquer thinner. Filled hole with JB Weld. The 24 hour type. Predrilled for tap size and retapped.. Works perfect.Saw is very old and not sure the part would still be available. WW
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snipped-for-privacy@nospambresnan.net says...

Why not put in a Helicoil?
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says...

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Cool. I prefer to drill and recoil or helicoil. For optimum strength I'll buy one of those expensive internal and external threaded sleeves from McMaster that has pins to keep it from turning. That being said, I had a hydraulic clutch on a car that the fittings on the master cylinder were held in place with JB Weld. JB Weld can do some amazing things on clean surfaces with lots of roughness to grip.
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I am told that my 1941 Oldsmobile Dynamic Cruiser has JB Welded parts down inside the transmission. It has worked well over the last ten years but I just drive er every other month or so and just around the block.
She is in the shop now getting a complete new front end (ball joints, bushings, tie-rods, etc. complete new brakes, carb rebuild, water pump, rear shocks and motor mounts. Also having the springs shortend to drop her a few inches. My mechanic, who does restorations only, really cringed when I told him about the JB weld, then told me several stories of difficult situations solved by the wonderful stuff. He did however add a contingent $1,500 for tranny work on my estimate.

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I am told that my 1941 Oldsmobile Dynamic Cruiser has JB Welded parts down inside the transmission. It has worked well over the last ten years but I just drive er every other month or so and just around the block.
She is in the shop now getting a complete new front end (ball joints, bushings, tie-rods, etc. complete new brakes, carb rebuild, water pump, rear shocks and motor mounts. Also having the springs shortend to drop her a few inches. My mechanic, who does restorations only, really cringed when I told him about the JB weld, then told me several stories of difficult situations solved by the wonderful stuff. He did however add a contingent $1,500 for tranny work on my estimate.
I have repaired so many items with JB weld that has saved me a lot of money. Great stuff. WW
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I don't think I've ever used JB weld. I have an industrial sewing machine with a broken (cast aluminum) hand wheel.... broken through the allen screw hole, 2 small dime size pieces, 2 large pieces. Fitting the pieces together and gently inserting the screw allows for the wheel to be assembled onto the 1/2" shaft and used lightly. Someday, it will fall apart, again, I'm sure. Should JB weld hold it securely? A new wheel costs about $75.
Sonny
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