Linseed Oil & Oak Barrel


Will a mixture of turpentine and linseed oil applied to a dry oak barrel cause the barrel to swell and tighten up?
Thanks MB
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It's designed to seal with liquid, what use would you think of putting it to that linseed (and LOTS of it) would solve?

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Before plywood, 'frozen snot', and other 'modern' materials, boats hulls were made of wood planking. In many of the smaller skiffs, etc. there was no caulking forced into the seams. Placing the finished boat into salt water {or throwing some salt into the bilge if in fresh water}for about a week, 'tightened her up'.
In larger craft, that was also one of the reasons why they actually WANTED some water in the bilge. Sometimes salt was even dumped in, to "keep her sweet". That is, to stop rot. Salt retards or stops it, the fungus thrives in fresh water.
WHITE Oak was used for stems, keels, keelsons, ribs, and other places a heavy, strong material was needed. My recommendation would be to 'sink' the barrel {with stones, rocks, etc.} in some salt water river mouth, bay, or estuary. If that is not available, try to find a plastic bag large enough to cover the barrel. Tape or tie it in place and fill the barrel with water, being sure to add about a box of Kosher salt {large crystals}. Keep the water level up, and see what happens after a week or so.
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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Soak it in water for a week or so to swell the joints tight, then keep it filled with water to prevent it drying out and shrinking again. I've used a couple of these over the years for rendezvous, and this is the only real way to keep them tight. Once you get it tight, you can melt a couple pounds of wax and slosh it around the insides to try to seal up any major holes and coat the wood if you plan to use it for drinking water.
Oak kegs give the water a distinctly nasty taste, along with a yellow color after a few days, hence the waxing attempts. The barrels will eventually rot out with all the water treatment, but you do get 6-7 years service out of them.

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I don't think so, but filling it with water very well might.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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