Lifting a Delta Unisaw

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Can a Delta Unisaw be safely lifted with a sling under the table.
If not, how do you lift it safely.
thanks
i
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Cast iron doesn't have terribly high tensile strength. I sure wouldn't try it.

Depends partly on how high you need to lift it, and for how long -- and if you need to move it while it's off the ground. If you need to lift it half an inch to retrieve some valuable item that rolled underneath it, wedges under the edge of the cabinet should do just fine. If you need to hoist it out of a basement, that's a different story.
Either way, though, I wouldn't put any stress at all on the table.
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I want to forklift it into a pickup truck. It is at a factory now and I will be picking it up tomorrow. So I thought to put slings under the table and lift it with the forklift forks hooked up to the slings. Now it seems like it is a bad idea.
i
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Just to clarify myself and answer "why can't you put forks under the base".
These guys have a loading dock for semi trucks that is higher than my truck's bed. So they cannot lower it into my truck from the top of the loading dock. Their forklift is not at ground level.
I can, however, put slings under the base.
i
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Some forklifts will lower the forks below wheel level; put the wheels on the lip of the dock and lower away.
Other suggestions: - use a dockplate. - Floorjack and jackstands for your pickup to level the bed with the dock. - A sling lift under the base would work, if a bit unstable.
scott
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Ignoramus10071 wrote: ...

Better choice if rig for tipover as the motor is mounted pretty high and is the bulk, of the weight w/ the top.
The table right at the mounting locations would be fine if you can get the straps there; what you definitely don't want to do is use the wings--they'll undoubtedly hold it for that long but may well warp them a little.
For more secure lifts where had farther to go (like a loft shop, for instance), I've removed the top and used lift-rated eyebolts in the mounting holes.
--
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First of all, thank you all for this thread.
I'm thinking about turning the unfinished room over the garage (UROG?) into a shop and the garage back into a garage. That means moving the Unisaw upstairs. The only way I see to do this is hoisting it up through a trap door (yet to be installed). The trap door would also be used to get material up to "finish" the room (and of course raw sawdust). Moving the saw is my only real concern though.

Will the table mounting holes hold the weight of the rest of the saw? The forces are the opposite of normal. A sling under is easy enough but as others have pointed out, the saw is top heavy. Top becoming bottom when in mid air wouldn't be good.
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It shouldn't be. Not the only concern, I mean.
Your first and primary concern should be whether the joists will support the weight. That's a heavy load, on a long span.
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On Sat, 12 Sep 2009 01:13:12 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

That isn't at all a concern in this space. ;-) I have no idea why the builder did it (the house was built in '07), but it's not a long span at all. The floor joists are 2x12s (16" O.C.), half the span with a (gotta be) 20"x6"x22' (?) wood beam down the center. So the 2x12s span perhaps 12'. On top of that (because of the beam sticking up in the middle), I'll have to put 2x6s, perhaps 2x8s crossways to get the floor above the beam. There is currently an OSB floor there (I use the space for staining and painting) but the center beam sticks up in the middle. I'm sure it'll take the 600lbs. ;-)
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You're putting a lot of worry into this. Maybe it might be easier for you to strip the saw as you're able and then hire a couple of movers to do the job for you. A couple of hours decent pay at most should be sufficient. What are you looking at? Maybe $200. Not a great deal. And if they can move huge refrigerators and pianos, they can sure move a table saw for you.
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wrote:

Not so much worry. The floor has to be raised to clear the center beam anyway and the materials have to be carted up to finish the room. I plan on doing all the work I'd need to do to turn it into a "FROG", except the finish flooring. Part of the reason for doing this is to claim a few more months woodworking (a couple of months both winter and summer). One of the heat pumps is already located in this space so extending its coverage shouldn't be difficult.
The point being that a trap door into the garage is a way of getting the materials, both construction and woodworking, up there without tearing up the house.
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You can do yourself a huge favor if you buy a electric hoist.
i
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On Sat, 12 Sep 2009 08:50:42 -0500, Ignoramus10071

Already have one - still in the box. This has been in the planning stage since before we bought the house. ;-) Though at one point I was thinking of going directly to the FROG stage, I'm now reconsidering. We really don't need more living space. The house is already 2600sq.ft. and only two of us.
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*snip*

When I was assembling my Ridgid TS3660, the first parts of assembly were done with the top on the bottom, then once the legs were added the saw was inverted.
Since you're transporting the saw, something similar could probably be done with yours. Depending on how the motor is mounted, it may need to be removed (mine would). You could then invert the saw and put the bulk of the weight on the bottom. If you're worried about straps or something damaging the top, try putting a piece of foam over the top to protect it.
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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On 12 Sep 2009 08:40:36 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

I came pretty much assembled, except for the wings and extension table.

As others pointed out, the motor is likely too much of a PITA to remove. Your idea of hoisting it inverted is a good one though. Removing the top would eliminate any chance of warping and hoisting it inverted would put the center of mass at the bottom.
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IF going very far, hanging on a sling, could very well be a problem. Inverted gives you a place for "C" clamps, through short sling loops. Not just any C clamp, stout ones, tight. Keep the load in line with the straps, don't stress the screw, C clamp T handle out board of load. DO NOT jerk the load, smooth and steady. I've done this many times, no problems, but, as I said, I've done this many times. Had a good teacher.
If for ANY reason you don't like the idea, do not do it. I have 40 years of moving things. I use a HF engin hoist.
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IIRC most loading docks have loading ramps so that a fork lift can actually drive onto multi height trailers. Could they not put the ramp down to your truck and "hand truck" it down the ramp?
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The ramps only go down about 6" below floor level, not far enough to get to a pickup bed.
Many factories, though, are built on a grade and have at least one overhead door at ground level where you can drive in or take a forklift outside.
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On 09/11/2009 08:38 AM, Ignoramus10071 wrote:

For any amount of distance, I'd remove the table. The cabinet can then be moved any way you feel like.
Chris
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A few years ago I helped a friend do almost the same thing.
We took off the wings, laid the table on its side on the shipping dock, and rigged a bunch of straps and lowered it into a pickup with a forklift. (Be careful rigging, it is not balanced)
We then drove the saw to his shop with it on its side in the back of the truck. (With padding and tied down)
It was no big deal.
Larry C
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