Lathe Recco for SWMBO

(Sorry for repeating this ... a third time ... but it didn't seem to get through the first two tries)
Slowly trying to get into woodworking after my Dad left me a bunch of tools, slowed down a bit by a military career, being recently married, moved, and now expecting ...
SWMBO hasn't really been interested in woodworking so far--until I happened to watch an episode of "Woodturning Basics" I saved on my DishPVR while she was in the room. Now she's interested in learning to turn wood. And far be it from me to turn down an opportunity and blessing to buy new machinery!
Any recommendations? We're not really interested in just turning pens, etc., so we'd like something capable of turning both decent-sized bowls and spindles. I'm torn between getting the $150 Grizzly basic model as an introductory/eventually discard starting lathe, and spending a bit more and getting something we can grow into ... I've done a google search, and gotten nothing very current (and a boatload of reviews of the movie "Lathe Of Heaven" which seems to be a bastardization of an Ursula K. LeGuin novel ...)
Also, what should I look for in a lathe? I've done some reading, and based on that it seems distinguishing features include:
- Between centers length==maximum length of object - Over-bed swing==maximum radius of object - Rotating headstock==bowls, etc. greater than Over-bed swing - Live center on tailstock - Spindle through-drilled - Faceplate and chuck (also available as accessories?) - Cast-iron bed - Indexing capability - Variable speed
I've also noted different lathes have different morse tapers and threading ... I'm assuming this affects what accessories I can purchase. Which is more important, a common morse taper or a common threading? I ask because one list of four lathes had varied between 3/4 and 1", and 8, 12, and 16 TPI. Do accessory makers cover them all, or should I try and hit the most common? If so, what IS most common?
Help, please! She's repeatedly said she'd like to learn to turn, so to me that sounds like a hint to buy a holiday gift we can share ... so I don't want to dawdle!
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Dave G wrote:

Be sure to post this message in rec.crafts.woodturning <g>
-- Mark
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So you want to turn something. Using a turning lathe may require a 9-10 ability to understand how it works and the proper use.
What you want is a Legacy Ornamental Lathe. This lathe can turn spindles that have a twist like rope on them, or you can unwrap the rope and turn what is called "hollow rope " which is open in the center.
You can also do flutes, reeds, fancy spirals where the top may be wider than the bottom,as well as duplicate anything as an exact duplicate. How would you like to turn 4 table legs that are exact duplicates, and with a tapper and knobs as well as mortice joints in the exact 90 degree locations?
Here is what you do. Call1-800-279-4570 and ask them to send you a free DVD which shows everything. Once you've seen this machine, you won't want another.
OH!!! and if you decide you want to use tools with a morse taper, it will handle tat as well as their own tools, live tail stock, left and right spiral, and items too great to number that a common lathe can't do. OH!!! And you don't need to know much except how to set the depth of a plunge router and to turn a crank. The system has locks on it so you can't overrun the stops and as long as the settings are the same, the duplication is the same.
So if you're a professional like Norm who has the 9-10 experience and you're not interested in doing reeds, flutes, tapers, rosettes, mortices, arches, contours, dados and much more with very little knowledge, get a lathe. But if you're not that experienced, get this DVD and see if it is for you.
Tell them WoodworkerJoe told you to call.
--

Lathe Recco for SWMBO

Group: rec.woodworking Date: Fri, Dec 5, 2003, 8:13pm (MST-1) From:
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So you want to turn something. Using a turning lathe may require a 9-10 ability to understand how it works and the proper use.
Exactly how does that differ from anything else???
What you want is a Legacy Ornamental Lathe. This lathe can turn spindles that have a twist like rope on them, or you can unwrap the rope and turn what is called "hollow rope " which is open in the center.
I thought that machine was for people that can justify the expense or those that could not master a lathe.
Tell them WoodworkerJoe told you to call.
Will they find that funny?
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I have a Delta Midi lathe and love it, turned lots of things. took a course at the StateU and will now be buying a Jet 1442. Very stable base, plenty of HP and rotating headstock if I ever need to turn a bowl larger than 27" in diameter. the "disposable" lathes with be tolerable for spindle work but it is my understanding that the bearings make bowl turning difficult. #2 morse taper and 1" 8 TPI is the more common although most chucks and centers come in a variety of sizes.
there are a lot of female turners in this area, hopefully she will get addicted. :-)
BRuce
Dave G wrote:

--
---

BRuce


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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (T.) wrote in message

SWMBO has (probably rightfully) come to the conclusion that I've gone too far to back out without reaching retirement now.

To have proof that I've engaged in marital relations with my wife ... or at least that somebody has ;>

Hah! Make one ... seriously, I want to strike while the iron's hot and get something before she decides she's not interested.

Thought about that, but haven't looked for the mailing list interface to that. I get rec.woodworking via WOODWORK-L, and prefer to have answers delivered to my email box rather than have to go look for them. However, I've since popped in over there via google groups.
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