Lasik

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Not trying to scare you but take a look at:
www.surgicaleyes.org www.lasikdisaster.com
There are complications that happen, and they are usually serious.
Chroinically dry eyes, double or triple vision, starbursts at night, loss of contrast sensitivity, etc. All of which can still read the 20/20 line on the eye chart, and are deemed a success.
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(brian roth) wrote:

Exactly why I urged caution. You can decide not to have the surgery now, and change your mind a year later, but it doesn't work the other way around.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
For a copy of my TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter, send email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com
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Glasses with the right lenses act as safety glasses. Lasik doesn't provide any protection. I always wear my glasses in the shop, when I was younger I wore a non-correcting pair whole working.

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I had lasik done maybe five years ago. Originally I did it for whitewater kayaking on cold Montana rivers where glasses are really a problem, but unfortunately my kayaking days ended soon after my Lasik for unrelated reasons. I began with very bad eyes, so bad that they were not doing Lasik on them in the U.S. not too long ago. My results are mixed. I can read part of the 20/20 line and glasses will not correct me to 20/20. But most of my vision is a bit odd after the surgery, a kind of fuzziness. And I have significant haloing at night so that I prefer not to drive at night too much, though I can do it. Still, it was worth it, though only marginally so. Prior to Lasick, particularly since I started wearing bifocals (or rather, "progressive lenses"), I had pretty much permanent eye strain. After Lasik, that went away completely. I do need my reading glasses, but can do some basic reading without them at the moment. Not too big a deal. Every time I get irritated by a halo at night, my wife reminds me that I no longer have any eyestrain! Sanford
snipped-for-privacy@control-tech.com (Charles Erskine) wrote in message

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That was one of the counter-inications they told me about.

Funny. I did mine last year, around August. Never looked back. I had -4 before and could hardly drive at night, while my short distance was going as well due to age.
Now I have better than 20:20 at distance. The night vision is back and I can drive again. The short distance is gone, but that is age-related and nothing I can do about it.
So, I have very thin +1.5 glasses for reading and working on the computer screen, and that's it.
Drawbacks? None that I can figure. Other than it being a lot more painful than what I was led to believe. A complete eye mask protecting from ANY light immediately after the surgery should IMHO be mandatory. And the first 6 hours are very uncomfortable. But at midnight I could read the TV text across the room!
Ah: and golf has never looked so good!
--
Cheers
Nuno Souto
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