kickback and technique

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Question about kickback and technique.
OK - I had a small piece. 3 1/2" X 4 1/2" X 3/4" that I wanted to cut a 45deg angle on the 4 1/2" side. Pretty strait forward. I was using Right tilt TS with the fence to the right of the blade. Using a push stick to cut the angle. The piece was already to size and I was just knocking off the corner. I encountered severe kickback. The piece shot toward me hit me so hard in the gut that it left a 3 1/2" bloody welt. Ouch! A heavy canvas apron would have been a good idea I suppose. The best idea is to learn a better technique for making this type of cut. Any suggestions? TIA.
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description, it sounds like you had nothing to support it. If that's the case... that's the reason you had a kickback.
So...
First off, a heavy canvas apron isn't going to make *any* difference. On a typical 10" table saw, the tips of the teeth are moving at about 100 mph, and that's approximately the speed the wood will be moving too. That's going to hurt, even through an apron. So the first thing to remember is to make sure you're not standing in the line of fire.
Second, it is imperative to have the wood securely supported, in this case by a miter gauge _at_minimum_. Add an auxiliary fence to the face of the miter gauge, if necessary, so that the wood is supported all the way up to the blade.
Third, for cuts on small pieces such as this, it's safer to clamp the workpiece to a carrier board or a crosscut sled, so that you're not trying to guide such a tiny piece of wood. The longer the guide surface you have available, the less likely you'll have a mishap.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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wrote:

support without adding an extension, I added this extension for some later cuts. The Sled sounds like a good idea and I should have considered it.
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On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 15:03:56 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

sure it would have. He'd have had a 3-1/2" welt with a heavy canvas pattern pressed into it....

really should be a sled.

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Yep, best answer is not to cut pieces that small on the table saw where they might bind.
Bandsaw, maybe, with a plane to smooth. I believe in that 10" minimum length they mention in my instruction manual.

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simple set of breackets to support some curtain hardware. Shouldn't have been too involved. Butt joints would have sufficed here and thats where I ended up.
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With small pieces, forget the fence and use the miter gauge and a method to clamp the wood to the miter gauge, OR use something liker a GRIPPER to support the wood on both sides of the sawblade
Only real injury I ever got with my tablesaw was cutting a small piece of wood like this, kicked back, and hit one of my fingers, ran up a $1000+ emergency room bill to get it fixed
John
wrote:

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John wrote:

most - when the job is too small to make a jig or get the "other" push stick and so on. If you have two minutes to do a two minute job then go get a drink of water instead.
Josie
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The standard rule for contracting services it to get three quotes. Obviously you neglected to do that and were raked over the proverbial coals. You may have gotten a better price across town. Waiting for the off hours may have gotten you a better rate too. Not to mention coupons!
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Hard to get mulitple quotes when there is only 2 ERs in town, and NEITHER give "quotes"
Frankly, I was NOT surprised, having worked in the health care industry for many years, thank heavens for health insurance, and I really feel bad for folks who get stuck with that $1000+ bill for about 5minutes worth of debriding and 4 stitches put in by a nurse Never saw a MD, never was evaluated by a ER doc, but I DID get bill from the ER doc, probably for "supervising" the nurse
Of course, they xray'd, and it took them 4+ hrs to get to me after I checked into the ER - but I wasn't bleeding to death and obviously was LOW on the triage list
John
wrote:

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You paid for yourself and the uninsured that brought their child into the ER because he has the sniffles. Hospitals incur a terrible waste of recources on that stuff.

Three years ago my wife got ill while we were on vacation. Had to take her to the first ER I could find (Those blue H signs are really a big help). Walked in, a nurse brought her a wheel chair, took her heart rate (190) and took her to a treatment room while the staff was gathering around. No stopping at the desk. They began treating her and did not even know her name, insurance, etc. It made up for all the horror stories you hear but the people that were already waiting probably did not think it was so great.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Speaking from experience, how fast you get treated in an emergency room is largely determined by how much danger the staff believes you are in. When my heart acted up five years ago I walked into the emergency room and up to the admitting desk.
"What is your problem?" Asked the nurse. "Hypochondria I hope!" I replied fervently. She took one look at me and they had me back in the room with a BP cuff on. Inside of five minutes I was on nitro, oxygen and hooked up to a heart monitor.
About ten days later I left the hospital the proud owner of a brand-new quintuple cardiac bypass. I found out sometime later they had told my wife they were afraid I wasn't going to make it through that first night.
--RC
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Quintuple! Wow! Glad you came out of it OK.
My father had an ER visit that began similarly, a few years ago. He came into the ER with a gray complexion, perspiring profusely, dizzy, and nauseated. He said that within a minute, they had him on a table, stripped to the waist, with an EKG attached. And then everybody calmed down when they saw there was nothing wrong with his heart. He left a few days later with a diagnosis of inner-ear infection, and prescriptions for potent antibiotics and sedatives. It was _six_months_ before the doctors cleared him to drive again.
Anybody who thinks that sight is the most important of the senses is forgetting about balance.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Thanks Doug.
Since heart disease runs in my family I had been alert for the signs for years. I didn't feel all that badly, but when the feeling started radiating down by left arm, I decided to go in.
Moral: Don't ignore the warning signs even if they don't lay you out with pain.
--RC
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Agreed - happened to me twice. Stumbled into an out-of-town ER with my first Kidney Stone, and the attending doc had had them Tossed me Demerol before the first paper was signed.
Popped into an ER Clinic last year. Nurse said "What's up."
I said, "I damned sorry to say what I'm about to say - but I have a pain in my chest."
Whooooosh! I think they ran over a few other poor souls rushing me back and onto an EKG.
Triage.
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On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 16:06:43 GMT, patrick conroy

I had the other end of that a couple of years ago. All it was was minor shooting pains in my left arm, but I had to fend off the EKG trolley with a pointy stick (RSI and tendonitis). And _of_course_ my chest hurt - I cycle off-road and my intercostal ligaments had been arguing with a tree just a few days earlier.
Mind you, if I'd been hospitalised in this town, I'd probably have been dead from MRSA by now. Terrible places hospitals - full of sick people and med students.
--
Smert' spamionam

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One of the great truths of our healthcare system is this - you only see your own doctor when you're healthy. Can't get an appointment - emergency department. We have a couple of "walk-in-clinics" here now where you can see a doctor when sick, but without the ED rates. Next level - Trauma center - takes more money still.

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We have a couple of "Urgent Care Centers" in town. They aren't 24/7, but they do provide a good level of treatment that is between "The Doctor can see you next Tuesday at 2:15" and the triage nurse in the hospital ER. I have been in 3 different ERs with chest pains over the years - it is truly amazing how fast they move when you say you think you might be having a heart attack. All 3 ER doctors told me that I should head straight for the emergency room at the first sign of chest pain and call 911 if it seemed at all severe. Being overweight and sedentary puts me right into that high risk group.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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You bet. Denial takes a lot of lives. Of course, we men are the worst offenders, but I see more and more women, who do not necessarily have the "classic" symptoms delaying until I lay out tube and defib and tell the partner to speed up.
All 3 ER doctors told me that I

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Without seeing it, this most likely happened because you didn't control the piece and it got caught between the blade and fence. I'd almost be willing to bet you were using a notched push stick?
This is a cut that can be made providing you exert _control_ over the piece between the blade and fence _all the way_ through the cut.
A good push block that will allow you to CONTROL the piece between the fence and the blade by exerting sufficient pressure, downward and toward the fence, while keeping you hand well away from the blade, is a must ... as you've found out.
Don't stand directly behind the cut, use a well designed push block as above, and when using your right tilt to bevel an edge, move the fence to the left side of the blade if you can.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/04/04
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