Keeping Bark on a slab

I have a slab of maple about 2 inches thick with an irregular shape that would be thr right size for an end table. The way this was cut the bark is on all the edges and I would like to keep it there. I will need to sand the upper and lower surfaces to get them smooth enough for a table and am concerned that the sanding action may break the bark free of the edge. It is already quite loose in some places
Any suggestions on how to glue or otherwise keep the bark attached?
TIA
Russ
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Maybe put the table in an inacccessible place? Sorry, but I think you've got a difficult goal here. Maybe multiple sprays of a clear laquer or poly or shellac, but again, sorry, it seems a tough row to hoe. You may have to accept the inevitable. You'll have bark on the carpet. Tom
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Take a tip from the turners and soak it with CA glue... turners often do that with natural edge bowls to keep the bark on.
John
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On Apr 6, 7:41 pm, "John Grossbohlin"

True. But if it is an end table, he would need about $ 1K of CA to get it stable!
There is a natural edged furniture guy I used to see from time to time, and he thinned out poly and put it into something that looked like a bread pan and rotated the barked area through the poly so it was heavily soaked when he was doing disks (rounds).
For long ovals (small bar tops and coffee tables cut on a really acute angle to teh grain) he slathered on the thinned poly with a large brush till it dripped off, then let it dry 3 - 4 days. Anything that fell off, he simply glued back on.
Worked for him.
YMMV.
Robert
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a couple of silly thoughts here: first, take the bark off and finish the table then put the bark back on with hidden dowels. OR Believe it or not,I have used JB weld successfully in repairing wood joints. (30 year old boat restoration) so return the bark and glue or inject JB or GOOP into the cracks, or cut/drill pilot holes in the bottom at the matching line and fill with glue.

True. But if it is an end table, he would need about $ 1K of CA to get it stable!
There is a natural edged furniture guy I used to see from time to time, and he thinned out poly and put it into something that looked like a bread pan and rotated the barked area through the poly so it was heavily soaked when he was doing disks (rounds).
For long ovals (small bar tops and coffee tables cut on a really acute angle to teh grain) he slathered on the thinned poly with a large brush till it dripped off, then let it dry 3 - 4 days. Anything that fell off, he simply glued back on.
Worked for him.
YMMV.
Robert
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True. But if it is an end table, he would need about $ 1K of CA to get it stable!
There is a natural edged furniture guy I used to see from time to time, and he thinned out poly and put it into something that looked like a bread pan and rotated the barked area through the poly so it was heavily soaked when he was doing disks (rounds).
For long ovals (small bar tops and coffee tables cut on a really acute angle to teh grain) he slathered on the thinned poly with a large brush till it dripped off, then let it dry 3 - 4 days. Anything that fell off, he simply glued back on.
Some of the turners I know use CA extensively and buy it in large containers... Apparently they find it cost effective because the majority of the ones I know are cheap cheap cheap... you can hear their wallets squeak if they have to PAY for wood. Free Wood.... Free Wood.... Free Wood.... is their mantra! LOL
John
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RE: Subject
I must admit my lack of knowledge on the subject; however, I have a question?
If the goal is to keep the bark FIRMLY attached in the final piece, why not lift the bark, coat the surfaces with epoxy, then reattach and allow epoxy to cure?
Am I missing something?
Lew
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Thanks for the multiple ideas. I may try a mix of them. In some places the bark is still well attached and in others it has pulled away by at least 1/2 inch. In areas where it is well attached I may try CA and for other areas use Epoxy. I would prefer to not actually remove the bark for the concern of getting it back in perfect alignment so that it looks right.
I am located in Upsate South Carolina so I may also be able to get some tips from nearby folks who make rustic furniture, all I have to do is find them.
In the mean time if there are other ideas please reply.
Russ

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On Tue, 7 Apr 2009 19:21:08 -0400, "Russ Stanton"

I haven't tried this exactly, but I've used the Minwax wood hardener on a carving and the results were similar to a soaking of CA glue. It leaves the wood with a consistancy that I would compare to a hard plastic. I would try this after gluing the loose pieces . A pint or two of the wood hardener would be considerably cheaper than the glue Afterwards, coat with you favorite finish.
HTH Bill
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Take it off, clean it up, stick it back on.
Most bark has some degree of beetle damage underneath it, chewing on that tasty layer of cambium (obviously dependent on species of both tree and local fauna). Bark that's already mostly severed isn't going to stay attached, let alone if the larvae in there are still active.
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Russ,
I made some outdoor solar lamp holders from pine log sections, and wanted to keep the bark on. I used 30 min epoxy, thinned a bunch with alcohol, maybe 50-50. I dripped it down the joint between bark and wood, a lot, and from both ends. Really soaked it. It's been out all winter, and thru the rain, and looks as good as new.
Hope this helps.....
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