Jointer technique question


Can someone explain to me in detail how to use jointer to make boards straight? I have 6" stationary jointer that is setup right to my knowledge: outfeed table is leveled with knives, infeed table is slightly lower. What happens is after I run board through jointer instead of staright edge I get more board material removed from board front. After several passes the board tiltts more and more towards the front edge.
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Check if the tables are co-planar. Raise the infeed table level with the outfeed, make a set of masterbars and see if there's any deviation along the front, back and diagonals of the tables. If that's not the case, check your technique. Tom
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Sasha wrote:

It sounds like your infeed and outfeed tables are not coplanar over their length. I suspect the end of the outfeed table is high.
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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If the outfeed is setup right, it could be that you press the board all the time on the infeed table. Once your board lands on outfeed table, you should concentrate on outfeed table more for pressing your board. There was a nice article in Wood magazie about a year ago explaing how to adjust the Joiner, I followed it and now I get strait board all the time. If this dose not help, check the wood mag. it will help surely. Maxen
Sasha wrote:

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Sasha wrote:

What do you mean by "tilts" towards front edge?
That implies to me a non-perpendicular to the tables fence, not a table alignment problem...
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Think wedge shape, narrower at outfeed end. Tom B
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Thomas Bunetta wrote:

That doesn't match what he actually wrote, either...
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I had a similar problem with my jointer and checked to find that the tables were coplanar. Turns out that a few thousandths count. The only way to really insure the blades are the same height as the outfeed table is with a dial indicator. I know, some people swear by the stick method. For me the stick method said everything is fine, the dial indicator showed the blades were high. When everything is just right you will feel the newly milled stock kind of stick to the tables. Dave

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Check out this link: http://www.woodmagazine.com/wood/story.jhtml ;jsessionid=DZPLVXQ1U0JN5QFIBQSCAOQ?storyid=/templatedata/wood/story/data/375.xml&catref=wd21

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It is a matter for getting a feel for holding the board on the infeed table without allowing it to move while feeding it through the blade. If your piece is longer than the infeed table it can be a real pain.
Once the front edge is through the blade it is held securely to the outfeed table.
You may also be taking too much of a cut
If a board is severely out of line I would put it through the table saw to establish an edge.
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As you can see, you're not really quite clear in your statement of the problem, thus the multitude of answers.
Equipment faults lead to consistent results, and point to a remedy. If you are cutting a wedge-shaped board with the leading edge narrower than the trailing, the outfeed table may be drooping. If the table were planar but low versus drooping, you'd get a snipe on the trailing edge
If the outfeed were high, the trailing edge would be narrower. This technique is used to make tapers on the jointer. You'd also feel the leading edge touching the edge of the outfeed table even after passing over the knives - something which should never happen.
Now allow me a third possibility. Sight the edge of your board. Is it bowed outward? on such boards it's a common error to hold the leading edge down tight to the outfeed table, as you should, allowing the rear to hang into the air. On such boards the best is to approach as if you were cutting a taper, moving the guard aside and placing the belly of the board on the infeed table, feeding across the high spot and lifting. Sight, reverse, do again until the board is mostly straight, then run in its entirety. Of course, you would be able to feed other boards to get a straight edge if this were your only problem.
BTW, though a lot of people talk about the importance of long outfeed and the danger of drooping outfeed, good technique suggests that the freshest planed six to eight inches of the board are the only reference you want on the outfeed. Either feed past your hand as it gives constant downward pressure - risking splinters or edge cuts - or feed, remove, and replace your hand to ensure this contact area is firm. That minimizes or eliminates a lot of problems, and is the only technique worth using to get a belly off the board or lower two high ends on the other side.
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