Jointer Planing

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made
Yup - that's why you have to look at the wood. Bad wood comes in all sizes, and species.
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wrote:

to
at
that
home
straight,
parallel,
guarantee
the
Hmmmmm.... wouldn't it have to be S6S if the ends were cut square?
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On Sat, 04 Dec 2004 14:23:35 GMT, "Mike Marlow"

maybe it would be S4S2E ??
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Yes! If this is waht you can afford it is much better than not having it at all. It will take a bit longer, you'll have to work a bit slower but it will work as well as anything else if you take the time.
Also:
1. Jointing edges: You start to be less efficent as the board lenght to table length ratio increases. A 6" table top jointer can easily joint a 24" board edge perfectly. Not so easy for a 6' edge.
2. Planing: This ratio is less important for planing but you can really only plane one side on the jointer. Then you need a planer to get parallel faces.
Starting with a 4 sided rough board; on the joiner joint one edge, plane one face; on the planer plane the other face; on the table saw parallel the other edge.
BW

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For my own clarification, why is the last edge always done on the table saw? I remember in shop class we would do a similiar sequence, using only a jointer and a table saw. I think it was jointer, table saw, jointer, tablesaw. I could be wrong, but just want the logic behind the method
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slindars asks:

The logic behind the method is simple parallelism. I don't know why you recall the second jointer use, but for the most part, machine prep of rough wood starts with flattening one face on the jointer, then swinging into jointing one edge. That gives, one expects, a smooth face that is square to one edge. You then plane the other face, which smooths that while it also makes it parallel to the first face. Finally, you pass the jointed edge along the fence of the table saw, ripping off waste from the other edge and creating another parallel, resulting in a S4S board with edges square to the faces, if all goes well.
It can be done other ways, but this is the most positive, the one most likely to result in consist and desirable results.
Charlie Self "Ambition is a poor excuse for not having sense enough to be lazy." Edgar Bergen, (Charlie McCarthy)
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(slindars) wrote:

No thickness planer in there anywhere?

Don't see how that's gonna work...

Steps are: A. joint one face flat. B. joint one edge straight, and square to that face. C. plane the unjointed face parallel to the jointed face. D. rip unjointed edge parallel to the jointed edge.
They don't have to be done in exactly this order, but A must come first, and B must come before D. So if it's easier for you to do them A-C-B-D, or A-B-D-C, that's fine.
Actually, my work flow looks more like A-B, A-B, A-B, A-B... until I've jointed every board, then C,C,C,C... until they're all planed, etc. Just easier for me to not have to move the wood from one machine to another any more than is necessary. A bonus is that everything has been surfaced to a consistent thickness before it hits the table saw; that way, I can use the offcuts as stickers when I'm stacking lumber. :-)
The reason for doing it this way is that, while jointers make things straight and flat, they can't make two opposite surfaces parallel. You can joint one face of a board straight and flat, but if you want the opposite side to be straight, flat, *and* parallel to the first side, you can't guarantee that on a jointer. That's what a planer is for.
Similarly, you can joint one edge straight and square to one of the faces. You can even joint the opposite edge straight and square to the same face. But there's no guarantee that it will be parallel to the first edge. That's what the table saw is for.
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