joint both edges before glue-up?

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One more observation. I have a Forrest WWII on my saw. I have a jointer. I match up the cut edges from the TS. Sometimes, there's no way I can improve on the fitup with a pass over the jointer. The cut off the TS looks polished and perfectly flat. What's to improve upon? Other times, a pass over the jointer is needed. Ain't no one answer right all the time in my shop. YMMV.
bob g.
TeamCasa wrote:

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"Robert Galloway" wrote in message

Bingo!
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On 17 Oct 2004 16:04:02 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hvc.rr.com (Doug) wrote:

if your saw blade produces a surface that leaves visible gaps at the glue line you can do either of 2 things. 1> get a better blade 2> clean up the edge. one pass on the jointer, especially with thejointer set to take a very fine cut won't get you out of parallel enough to matter.
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snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote in message (Doug) wrote:

Thanks for all of the comments. It sounds like I will go with the above suggestion (the way I was leaning anyway!). It seems like a light pass after ripping won't do anything more than clean up the saw marks, and won't throw the edge far enough out of parallel to the other side to be of concern.
I'm interested by the debate over the quality of the edge after either ripping or jointing. I have a brand new jointer and the edge it gives is superior. I will admit that my TS is only of mediocre quality, but I just can't imagine ever getting the edge as perfect as one can with a properly tuned jointer. Guess I better keep working on my technique (I do use featherboards, and outfeed tables:)
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(Doug) wrote:

You'd be amazed at how much improvement you'll get from a really good blade (such as a Forrest WoodWorker II), even on a mediocre table saw.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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"Doug" wrote in message

IMO, it is a matter of personal preference and/or the way you're accustomed to doing certain operations. For instance, I almost always joint both edges of a critical glueup, even with a sharp(ened) WWII on the table saw. From a recent post that addresses your "parallel edges" query:
When you do your layout for your glue-up, and after you've used your "cabinet maker's mark" of choice to mark the order of the boards, faceup, put an "I" on one side, and an "O" on the opposite side of each joint with a piece of chalk/pencil.
"I" (inside) means that face goes against the jointer fence.
"O" (outside) means that face goes away from the jointer fence.
This will go a long way to insuring you take advantage of complementary angles without getting mixed up, and will speed the process tremendously
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This process does indeed eliminate any worries about edge parallelism across the width, by insuring that any errors that may exist will cancel each other out when the glue-up is assembled.
However, it does nothing to address the worries about edge parallelism along the length. Jointing both edges of a board risks introducing a taper -- which was the concern cited by the original poster IIRC.
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"Doug Miller" wrote in message

Obviously, were you jointing rough stock it would be misuse of the tool, but I don't recall that being the situation here.
IME, any "worries' would be minimal at worst ... in practice, a light pass over the jointer should not be a big concern.
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concern. If you joint after ripping, you can't be guaranteed of parallel edges any more. All you can do is act to minimize the degree of divergence.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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"Doug Miller" wrote in message

IMO, you are simply making a mountain out of a molehill in the OP's situation. Ripping to final width will insure the two edges that count are parallel ... wooddorkers need to apply a little common sense to their theoretical "concerns".
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Exactly. Dave

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