Jet Bandsaw question


I rip 3/4" walnut on my Jet 14" bandsaw with a 1/2"blade. It's been going great for a year (ripped about 500 feet) with no adjustments made. (If it ain't broke, don't fix it) Well, I thought I'd give the saw a treat for the new year and put on a new blade. Now the &%#@ing thing wanders all over the place and I can't get it to rip using the fence. Sooooo, I put the old blade back on and now it's running smoothly again. Both blades came from the same shop. Any guesses what's happening? Thanks
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Is it a slightly different length? maybe tighten up the tension a notch and check the tracking.
thing

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thing

Every blade is different. Fence adjustment may be needed for the new blade. Most blades require their own unique fence adjustment.
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On Wed, 04 Jan 2006 23:43:20 GMT, "Leon"

What Leon said ! Also, not uncommon at all to get a bad blade. Poor welds being my most common complaint. Seems like fro every good blade I've bought locally, I have gotten two that weren't worth a darn. Gotta try ordering some good ones sometime. Lenny
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thing

DAGS for bandsaw blade drift. Assuming it tracks properly and the tension is set properly, each blade has its own drift. Once you determine what your's is, set your fence for the drift and straight cuts are in your future.
Dave
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Each blade has its own drift angle. Mark a line parallel to the edge of a board. Cut along this line freehand until blade is cutting straight down the line. Cut off the saw and adjust the fence to edge of the board. This fence is now adjusted to how that blade cuts.
For a really good book on this, jigs, tuning up your bandsaw, etc., pick up the "Bandsaw Handbook", by Mark Duginske.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)36419336/sr=2-3/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_3/102-4982806-8424147?s=books&v=glance&n(3155
Preston
thing

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Also try rounding of the rear of the blade with a sharpening stone. With the blade running gently round off the rear of the blade with the stone.
JJS
Robert Kline wrote:

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Robert:
Sounds like a bad weld or maybe a tooth problem, but regardless, just take it back and get a new one!
Robert Kline wrote:

--
Joseph Connors
The New Golden Rule:
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I am not a top tool tech of any sort but what about the tires? would they be wore out by being rounded over and just use to the old blade config?
Don D.
thing wanders all

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On Wed, 04 Jan 2006 16:59:23 -0600, Robert Kline
Probably a length / elastic modulus variation. Simpler bandsaws are very cross-dependent between tension and tracking settings. Re-tension it equally after changing the belt and the wheel position might now be different enough to throw the tracking out. I've even seen saws where cleaning accumulated dust from around the upper wheel mount was enough to cant the tracking over a bit.
Whenever you've changed one setting, you really need to work through the list again - tension, tracking and right out to the guides. You can't just hot-swap one at a time.
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