Is crack a common drug for ebay bidders?

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No. Ebay is not a sealed bid auction. In a sealed bid auction, all bidding is completely secret until the end of the auction. Until the bidding closes, none of the bidders has *any* information about the number of competing bidders, their identities, or the amounts they have bid. After close of bidding, all this information is made public at once. Thus, each bidder has no reason to do anything other than to make a single bid at the lowest price he believes will be sufficient to win the auction, or the maximum he is willing to pay, whichever is less -- and no reason to make a last-minute bid, either.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 16:11:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Not entirely true. On a normal auction you can see who has bid, when they bid and what their maximum bid was for all but the current high bidder. The only information that is hidden is the maximum bid of the current high bidder. It is therefore not exactly like a sealed bid auction, but has many of the characteristics of a combined sealed bid and silent auction.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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wrote:

That is

bidding is

none
bidders,
Yeah, that is what I meant to say.
-j
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wrote:

But e-bay is not a "real" auction in that sense. It is a silent auction with sealed bids. If you proxy bid your maximum you will never get sniped unless the sniper is willing to pay more than you are - exactly the same as if the auction continued until there were no more bids. The problem isn't with e-bay, it is with the poor understanding most people have of proxy bidding.
Tim Douglass
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wrote:

You are correct. A "sniper" bid is no different than any other bid. It is only a "snipe" when it is placed near the end of the bidding period. As far as the operation within eBay is concerned, it doesn't matter whether the bid is placed manually or using some "clock-watcher" software program.
eBay enters (and increases to the proxy maximum) the "snipe" bid exactly the same way as any other proxy bid is entered (and increased). If you lose an eBay auction to a "sniper", it is simply because you either didn't enter the true maximum amount you were willing to pay, or the later bidder was willing to pay more.
In the absence of unusual circumstances, I will typically enter only one bid in an eBay auction. But that bid will be for an amount which I am not willing to exceed - not even by one cent. Also, it will typically be entered very late in the auction. If the auction ends with mine as the highest bid, it is only because my proxy maximum was higher than anyone else's proxy maximum. If that makes me a sniper, then "lock and load".
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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That's pretty much the way I've been doing it. About the only exception I'll make is probing a reserve. Some sellers I am familiar with will list items with and without reserve. Typically their reserve plus S&H is higher than I want to pay and sometimes higher than I can buy elsewhere off the shelf. If I bid the minimum right off the bat and find a reserve, I know not to waste any more time on the item.
Can't see what all the fuss is about, but I wasn't sure exactly how e-bay worked internally. Thanks for clearing that up for me.
LD

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I've tried to figure out e-bay and the way you say you bid makes sense; however, why do you enter your one bid "very late in the auction"? Is that to reduce the time for people to outbid simply on a competitive basis?
Charles Lerner
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It is to keep the level of interest down. Some people bid on items based on the number of bids it has. They believe a popular item must be a good one. This is a fallacy.
Also sometimes people get caught up in bidding as a sport or competition. It is better for the buyer to resist this temptation. By bidding later you don't have doubts gnawing at you for a long time and you don't gain the sense of having to win the item that you do by looking at it for a whole week.
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On 10 Nov 2004 15:32:52 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Charles Lerner) wrote:

It is strictly a bidding tactic. Let's say I submit my maximum bid of $25 as the first bid for an item whose opening bid is $10.00. The bid will be entered as a $10 bid. Now, along comes "John Nibbler" and bids $15.00. (For simplicity, let's assume a constant bid increment of $1.00). The proxy system will advance the bid to $16.00 with me still as the high bidder. Mr. Nibbler thinks about it for a while and decides that if he was willing to pay $15.00 then maybe it's worth $17.00. So he bids $17.00. The current bid jumps to $18 and I'm still the high bidder. Now, Mr. Nibbler feels the competitive juices begin to flow and begins to think of it as a sporting event or contest that he must WIN at all costs.
Mr. Nibbler then submits a sequence of bids with small incremental increases in the maximum until he is the "HIGH BIDDER" and "WINS" the contest. He has totally forgotten that an auction is not a competition in which there are winners and losers but is simply a venue for buying and selling. I have participated in auctions where the same bidder has submitted up to a dozen bids with only a dollar or two separating the bid amounts. That type of bidding is entirely appropriate in a live auction, but strikes me as somewhat asinine in a proxy bidding environment such as eBay.
I try to always avoid the use of the terms "WIN" and "LOSE" when the topic of discussion is an eBay auction. Bid what you are willing to pay, and walk away. But, if you do it early in the auction, you are very likely to fall prey to old John Nibbler running the price up too high so he can shout, "I WON!!!!". In truth, all Mr. Nibbler has accomplished is to pay too much for the item and artificially, and hopefully, temporarily, inflate the item's market value.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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    Greetings and salutations...     As regards bidding on Ebay...there is no sanity or reason to it...nor logic. just go with the flow.
On 10 Nov 2004 15:32:52 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Charles Lerner) wrote:
    *snip*

    Now, I have been a sniper for a long time on Ebay, and, the reason I do it is that I have come to the conclusion that there is a fairly large group of people who search for my user ID constantly, and, immediately bid anything I am going for well up over retail when they find it. It has happened JUST often enough to convince me of this fact. It is almost as if when folks see me bidding on something a little voice in their head says "This has GOT to be a great bargain, no matter WHAT it costs!!!! SO BUY IT!".     So...now...I fire off a bid in the last 20 seconds or so for the max I am willing to pay for the item. As others have mentioned, if I get it, great. If not, I know that there will be another one coming down the pike pretty soon.     As for the complaints about the seller not getting "enough" for the item...if this is a problem, just put a reserve on it and stick to it. Of course, that might well mean that the seller gets to post (and pay ebay) several times for the auctioned item.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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No doubt this is true. I've done it. If I see someone bidding on the same things I've been looking at I check to see if there is something else they are bidding on to see if there is something of interest that I don't know about.
For example suppose I'm bidding on a Norris infill plane and norm1234 is bidding on it too. I check his other bids and find out that he is bidding on this thing called a Steve Knight Coffin Smoother. Hmmm. I hadn't thought to search for that, but hey it looks like a good thing to bid on.
The only thing that is false is the "great bargain" part. Discretion is always necessary.
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How do you check to see what items somebody is bidding on?
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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wrote:

they
http://ebay.com click "advanced search" http://search.ebay.com/ws/search/AdvSearch ? on the left nav bar click "items by bidder"
-j
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I'll be darned. Never knew that was there. Thanks!
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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You have an option: bid the maximum you are willing to pay and wait until the 'auction' is finished. If someone 'snipes' you for a dime, then you were not willing to pay X+10 cents.
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wrote:

something
offer.
Sealed bid auctions have been around for quite a long time. They are no different from the model used by ebay. Ebay picked this model because it offers advantages to buyers and sellers, especially buyers who are scattered around the world in different timezones and who have better things to do than last minute bidding on auctions. (and what if they are interested in two things closing at the same time? Judging by the number of users it seems to work out well for most people.
The millennium of precedent was set by auction houses which take a cut of the fees. They have a vested interest in the highest price. Ebay makes up for it in volume and by attracting bidders from around the world.
Sniping hurts no one. You always have the option to bid what you want at anytime. If you don't win it is because you don't want to pay more than the other guy.
-J
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Unless you, as a buyer, get smart and actually make the proxy bid that is the maximum you are willing to pay. In that case no sniper can pick it off unless they are willing to pay more than your maximum. If you would bid more if you knew you were outbid in the last second then you didn't bid your maximum and have no room to complain.
Always put you initial bid in at the absolute maximum you are willing to pay, then walk away and don't look again until after the auction has closed. If you get it - great, If not, something similar will be along soon enough.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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So you admit that a sniper's goal is to pay as little for the item as he can, right? As an occasional seller, I'd prefer that bidders each have the chance to bid against each other fairly.
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I would assume that is EVERY bidder's goal. It is certainly my goal in any auction whether my bid is placed 5 seconds after the bidding opens or 5 seconds before the bidding closes.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Yes, and in a fair and equitable system, both bidders will have an equal chance to do so. By chosing to snipe, you are depriving the other bidder of that chance.
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