Is crack a common drug for ebay bidders?

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I can't for the life of me believe the bidding that goes on on ebay for lie nielsen tools. I'm now seeing planes going for more than LN sells them for on their website. Are people that stupid
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Yes, they are that stupid. I collect fountain pens. I've seen brand new retail $30 pens go for $50 on eBay. I've seen antique pens worth $100 go for $20. Probably because they are old.
There are bargains, but you have to know what things are worth and know when to stop bidding.
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wrote:

The worst is consumer electronics, I've given up looking for a bargain in those categories. Too many ignorant people with auction fever.
TWS http://tomstudwell.com/allprojects.htm
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No kidding. I needed an XD card for my camera. I thought, I bet a good deal can be had from ebay. Wrongo! I went to costco and paid $20 less than ebay. SH
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I've gotten some really good deals on eBay but mostly on niche items or items where the auction expires at a really weird time like 2AM Pacific Time. It seems the prices tend to increase rapidly in the last 5 minutes of an auction so if you can find one that expires at a weird time (and you're willing to stay up/get up at that hour) you might be able to get a bargain.
I've bought everything from a $1 legal size digital scanner to a boat and two cars on eBay but I'm disciplined enough to bid what the price I'm willing to pay and I don't bid twice.
Some categories I won't even bother with - consumer electronics is one of them.
I've gotten some decent wood on eBay but not at bargain prices. The advantage of eBay for wood purchases is the ability to quickly look through a huge 'stack' of wood and find something that you like for a specific project. In most of these cases price is not the issue (within reason of course ;-) Saves on gas (petrol for our friends across the sea) too...
TWS
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wrote:

for sure on the knowing when to stop! I bid on a lot of Shopsmith stuff on Ebay, so when something comes up, I go to the SS web site and price it... Obviously, most folks don't, because I see a lot of used stuff going for more than the new price.. bidding fever? caught up in the moment?? dunno...
A friend bought a sears router template kit for letters and used it quite a few times... bought it for $19.95 and sold it for $21 plus shipping on ebay...
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I have been bidding on a few things for my brother who recently bought a used Shopsmith 500. One item, the front table extension, sells regularly from Shopsmith at $49.99, I have seen several go by at from $50 to $80 in the last few weeks. Others have gone by at around $35 to $40, which is still too much (esp. given that they are on sale now at shopsmith at $42.50).
Dave Hall
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Or sometimes you just want to WIN the fscking auction and get on with your life. I paid grossly too much for a trumpet because I was shopping for that kind of trumpet, this one was in much better than average condition, and I wanted to WIN IT ALREADY, so I could stop having to juggle the watchlist. I got sniped, sniped again, sniped a third time, sniped a fourth time... All of this took me over two weeks, because I didn't want to have two bids out at the same time. I don't bid more than I can afford.
I decided to jack up the price on the last one so ridiculously high that I would win it once and for all. Tracking auctions is a bitch when you're on the road. You have to try to juggle it so you can be there for the closing minute, which is where almost all auctions anybody cares the least bit about are won or lost. I was tired of getting sniped by someone without a job. (Or someone who sucked enough to actually use sniping software. Loser.)
Little did I expect that I would only win it by $0.51. Ouch. I didn't think anybody would be insane enough to come anywhere close to my final, completely absurd bid.
Then of course one better looking came along the next day, and went for $75 less. <sigh>
Oh well. Like I said, it was a combination of factors. In this case, the item in question is more like an old Stanley. Lots of old planes, in lots of stages of disrepair, and the cheap ones are almost always in pretty seriously crappy condition. This was something like finding a 1950s vintage #5 in 98% condition. Tons of #5s listed every day, and not exactly the cream of the crop, but how often do you find one this pristine? So I paid waaaaaaaay too much.
Screw it. I enjoy playing my trumpet, and I'm glad I finally won the damn thing after nearly three weeks of being sniped by people with no jobs.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 04:12:01 -0500, Silvan

but used musical instruments are slightly different from mass produced tools or parts...
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mac davis wrote:

Not really that much, no. I think old (mass produced) instruments vs. old (mass produced) planes is an apt comparison. Perhaps what you're getting at is that used, old, out of production stuff is a different market from buying something that's still on sale new. In that case, I agree completely. People paying more than retail for items that are currently and readily available is pretty nuts.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 04:12:01 -0500, Silvan wrote:

Shame, because sniping software is perfect for the situation you were in. You can group a set of similar auctions together and it will snipe until it wins one of them and then stop. That way you can go after multiple items without worrying about ending up with more than one. Sniping, with or without software help, also protects you from shill bidding.

I would review the bidding history on the item, as something like that raises a red flag for me. Sometimes it just happens like that though, I had one a while back where someone outbid me by exactly 1 cent in one try.
-Leuf
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Sniping, with or without software help, is good only to pay less for something than it's worth. It cheats sellers out of getting a fair price.
Look at it this way - in a "real" auction, the auctioneer doesn't say "I'll listen to bids until (time)", he takes bids until nobody else is bidding. Some online auction houses have an optional "15-minute rule" - if someone bids within 15 minutes of the end of the auction, the auction end time is bumped out an additional 15 minutes to give someone else a chance. More fair to the seller, more fair to the guy honestly trying to buy it, and makes sniping software ineffective.
That would inconvenience people trying to snipe and pay less for an item than a fair auction would bring, but I'm OK with that.
Dave Hinz
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I'm curious about your notion of 'fairness' in this respect. eBay in particular allows everybody to bid what they are willing to pay for the item. The fact that it ends at a fixed time makes it purely a matter of awarding the item to the person willing to pay the most without prolonging the auction to allow the 'fools to rush in' and avoids the 'auction fever' that develops when your 'highest' price has been outbid. I'm not sure I would participate in an auction that could go on as long as people were willing to bid. Too many ignorant people in the world, it would be a waste of time and even more unlikely to get a 'fair' price on an item you were buying. Certainly great for sellers though...
TWS
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Yes, but has a mechanism to inform a bidder that their offer has been exceeded by someone else, yes?

See, and there's the thing. If I'm _selling_ an item, I _want_ the "auction fever" to kick in. If two guys want it bad enough, let 'em fight it out fairly to see who wants to buy it. Don't sell it to the first person to download scumware to cheat me out of my potential sales amount.
Now, let's look at it as a buyer. I really want that widget, but I want to pay as little as I can for it, but I _really want_ to buy it. I bid what I think it'll go for, and seconds before it expires, someone snipes it for slightly more than I bid, not giving me a chance to make another offer. It's an unfair advantage for those willing to resort to sniping software.
> I'm not sure I would participate in an auction that

See, but that's the thing. A millennium of precident has been set for auctions to run that way. It is done that way in real auctions because it works for all concerned. Given an option of selling something with the 15-minute rule, or without the 15-minute rule, I'd prefer with. Likewise, if I'm buying, I'd rather buy in an environment where sniping is ineffective as a result of said 15-minute rule. You're always free to stop bidding if you get tired or the numbers go too high, after all.

An auction should be about finding the buyer who is willing to pay the most money for an item, not about who has the fastest web connection or the most feature-rich sniping software. Works best for buyers, and for sellers.
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<snip>

eBay has proxy bidding. This allows you to bid the maximum you are willing to pay so you don't have to have instantaneous access to the bidding status, eBay will do your up-bidding for you.
IMHO & IME the 'fairest' thing to do as a buyer is to bid your highest price you are willing to pay at the very last instant. If there is someone who's willing to pay more - fine, he gets it. If the next closest bidder is 10 bucks less than my maximum then I get it for less than my maximum - either way it's fair.
<snip>

If you use proxy bidding there is very little data sent to place a bid so fast Internet connections have only a slight advantage over dial up. If you are a 'bid, watch, bid, watch' kind of bidder then you'll probably lose out either way because you'll always be outbid by the sniper if there is one.
TWS
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Exactly, and sniping bypasses all of that. The sniper gets to pick his max as 50 cents more than yours, rather than their real max.
In a real auction, you've got the "going...going...gone" to make sure everyone gets their bids in. Much as I like eBay, I'd like 'em a lot more if they had the 15-minute option.
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Question: assume there is less than a minute left on an item and someone bids more than your current bid, but less than your maximum bid, what does e-bay do? I suspect they outbid the sniper for you, then notify the sniper that he's been outbid. At which point it is likely too late for him to bid again. IF this is true, then bidding your maximum means that you will never be outbid by a bid under your maximum.

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Answer: many people use sniping software or services that automatically increase the bid to continue to beat the proxy bid that eBay is making. If the max proxy bid is more that the max sniping bid, then the proxy will win. Otherwise the sniper will win.
todd
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IOW, if you bid the maximum you are willing to pay for an item, a sniper cannot get that item for less. Doesn't seem like an issue.

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For whatever reason, many people do not bid the maximum amount they would pay. Don't ask me why this is. Perhaps they subconsciously think of it more in terms of a live auction and bid enough to outbid the current high bid. The proof is that sniping is very often successful.
todd
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