interesting metal (etching) concept

http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2015/0122/This-metal-surface-wants-absolutely-nothing-to-do-with-water
Tools, firearms, etc notwithstanding, wonder what a boat hull application would do?
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"Swingman" wrote:
http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2015/0122/This-metal-surface-wants-absolutely-nothing-to-do-with-water

Especially if it would keep barnacles from attaching to the underwater portion of the hull.
Lew
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On 1/22/2015 2:28 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

De-icing would not be needed.
Cooking and clothes. PC - the little ones - repel water down in the material interfaces - screen to case...
Very nice work.
Martin
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On 1/22/2015 2:05 PM, Swingman wrote:

Really cool. I would love to see what it looks like under a microscope.
I wonder if it would still repel water vapor since it is more gaseous.
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On Thursday, January 22, 2015 at 2:05:55 PM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

What if *everything* within a contained space was etched in this manner? Wh ere would the water land? Would it bounce around forever? If it would, coul d you harness that energy and create the ever elusive perpetual motion mach ine?
The speaker mentioned that one advantage was that it was not a coating, the refore would not wear off. That got me wondering if the etching could event ually get filled up with minute particles of dirt. Perhaps the etching is s o small that nothing (yet) could fill the spacing. He did use the terms mic ro and nano scale, so perhaps that is not an issue.
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The water repelling (and self-cleaning) behavior requires the aid of gravity. That means a flat surface will still collect water and dust/dirt.

If the surface is tilted with respect to level, as the water washes the surface, it takes dust with it. The advantage of this surface treatment is that the tilt needs to only be a couple of degrees, vs. thirty or more for standard water repellant surfaces.
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On Friday, January 23, 2015 at 12:14:47 PM UTC-5, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Why would there need to be a flat surface within the contained space? Angle everything and continually rotate the space.
Here's my plan: Use the energy harnessed from the continually bouncing water to provide power to the motor that rotates the space.
Perpetual Motion! ;-)
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On 1/22/15, 12:05 PM, Swingman wrote:

Given how long it takes to do a square inch, a boat hull may be a few years away 8^)
Now if they could get it to shed water in a preferred direction, a self propelling boat would be kinda cool,
-BR
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