Interested In Woodworkng

Hi I would like to start wood working and make projects . What are the main tools I would need? What would simple projects should I start with until I get the hang of it ? Thanks , Jan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fri, Oct 8, 2004, 7:02pm (EDT-1) NorthernGal2 snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (NorthernGal) burbled: Hi
Hi.
I would like to start wood working and make projects .
OK.
What are the main tools I would need?
I dunno. It would depend in good part on what type of stuff you want to make.
What would simple projects should I start with until I get the hang of it ?
I dunno. It would depend on what type of stuff you want to make.
Thanks ,
Welcome.
JOAT I smile because I know my God loves me. You on the other hand, he doesn't much like.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
depends what projects you are looking to build...small crafts? 3/8"drill with a set of bits and a good portable or stationary jig-saw (latter can be a lot of fun and you can do some pretty wild stuff with it and it's a pretty safe tool to use). Bird houses/feeders? (a long time ago I took it upon myself to give the eastern bluebirds some houses in the hope they would come...they did!!!)...add to the above a fairly inexpensive table top table saw (if you get into the hobby you'll be sorry you didn't get a good stationary table saw but chalk it up to education cost).
Always a good combination square (I've had a Stanley 12" for too long to say) and good tape measure. And don't forget the safety glasses.
Go beyond that, you will have started another 1,500 message thread arguing about order of importance of table saw, jointer, planer, miter saw, drill press, band saw, router, shaper and the occassional radial arm saw.
Most of us avoid the argument by simply getting one or more of everthing.
Good luck

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Troll Alert!
On Fri, 8 Oct 2004 19:02:31 -0500, NorthernGal2 snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Northern Gal) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don;t think so, but even so a good thread to have in the archives given the smart replies so far.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's sad isn't it, that you think so. Yet this is just the sort of question that the Trolls often post, and we've had a fair few trolls around of late..
It's a good question though, so troll or not it's worth answering -- but check for crossposts just in case !
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dear Northern:
The difficulty that I know of is just one of money and time.
Woodworking cost money; money for the basic machinery, money to buy the raw stock, tool bits and blades, finishing material and all kind of junk products you will buy because you read something in a woodworking magazine. And don't forget to spend money on a magazine or two.
Woodworking takes time; at first just learning how to use the tools, and then cutting, assembly, sanding, finishing, and so on. Oh, by the way, there will come a day when you discover that you have to sharpen your tools and specifically your hand tools which will blow away several days. Trust me, the whole sharpening thing is a LONG discussion here.
As you follow this Newsgroup, you will find a significant number of the regulars are in the hobby for the tool technology. A plain fact: the woodworking craftsmen and craftswomen at Williamsburg can make better projects with hand tools than I can with over $4000.00 of power tools. As a tourist, I watched them start and complete a part of a project in less time it would have taken me just to set up the jigs for my power tools.
Now comes the hard part. Once you start your buying woodworking tools, and maybe machinery, you will reach a point of frustration because you need to get over a learning curve before you reach the reward of completing a project you will be proud of. Hang in there. The reward is well worth the effort.
By the way, scroll-saw is a easy starting point with quick results. I would also suggest a good set of turning tools and a lathe will also bring quick results you can be proud of. If you start down the "cabinet maker" path, with table saw, band saw, jointer, shaper, thickness sander, plunge router and table, dust collector, air compressor and lines, plus all the sanding and finishing gear, well just bring a fat wallet.
Good luck

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 8 Oct 2004 19:02:31 -0500, NorthernGal2 snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Northern Gal) wrote:

I started doing some small projects like a utility bench, birdhouses (same here with the Bluebirds), batbox, Adirondack chairs, wall shelves, workbench, and etc.
The tools I started with I pretty much already had, such as: circular saw (old B&D), saber saw (B&D), tape measure, T-square (I think this may have been my grandfather's), 3/8' electric drill ( with adapter to sand with), some automotive tools (screw drivers and such) and paint brushes.
I started with the utility benches. I used scrap material from a new housing construction. I built a dozen of these for family and even sold a few. I then moved up to some chairs made from 2X4 studs. Check out your library for woodworking books that have plans. This really helped with the chairs.
Tools I've bought during this adventure are: miter saw (a father's day present), drill attachment for boring larger hole for birdhouses, battery 3/8" drill, table saw (a nephew donation), saw blades, router (Christmas present) and bit set (this cut down on a lot of sanding and edge rounding).
I've learned a lot by reading books from the library and then applying ideas and projects. I've made shop jigs, a workable router table, workbench, and now looking towards a sofa table for the daughter. The SWMBO is happy with the cornices and hanging wall shelves. That's kinda made up for using half of the garage for the woodworking area and tools, ha!
I'd suggest starting with something that will be useful and straight forward to use, like utility benches. I got that idea from watching the DIY channel and there were free plans for it at their site. Just cutting 2X4, 2X10, and some 1X4 and screwing together. Low cost and practical.
Good luck and have fun,
Thunder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Northern Gal, I see that my collegues responses, bless them, have been a little predictable. Tool choice and priority are matters of religious debate 'round here, and one item of doctrine is "use the right tool for the right job." Hence all the answer of "I dunno, what do you want to make?"
There are, however, universal tools that all of us own, at least in general terms. All woodworking tools are task-based. There are three tasks in woodworking: measuring/marking stuff, cutting stuff, and fastening stuff together. (Finishing is actually also necessary, but is generally treated as a separate process from "making."
To start, you will need a measuring tool. Guys here will talk about calipers, dividers, rules, rulers, and chalk-lines until you're blue in the face. But a simple Stanley tape measure will get you started. It will give you adequate accuracy for bird houses, book ends, and bookshelves. For a beginner, a 10' is probably adequate.
You will need a claw hammer. Again, my collegues will talk about mallets, nail guns, ball peens(!) and the like. You will want a hammer with curved claws for extracing nails. If you are slender-framed, get a 12 oz or 14 oz hammer. If you are beefier in build, you might consider a 16 ounce or 18 ounce head.
You will need a saw. You can start out with a combination handsaw from any hardware store. It will allow you to make the basic crosscuts and rip cuts necessary for birdhouses and bookshelves.
You will also want a toolbox that you can store all this stuff in.
Please post any follow-up questions as you see fit.
Welcome to two new hobbies: woodworking and tool accumulating.
Will
NorthernGal2 snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Northern Gal) wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill McNutt said:

I personally would lean towards a 3' or 4' aluminum metal rule for woodworking - in addition to the tape rule. They are relatively cheap. Compare all measuring instruments and confirm they measure the same - they often won't!
Also, a basic set of chisels might be in order. You can get a 4 piece set of Record Marples Blue Chips at Lowes for $19.95. The set includes 1/4", 1/2", 3/4" and 1".

Same here. Accumulating tools, that is... ;-)
FWIW,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nowadays they are being shipped a "Irwin", same color handles. Considering old stock you could find either type of packaging in the stores.
The BC chisels have been praised in magazine reviews for the quality of the steel, but no one likes the handles. Also, Irwin may have made a change in steel quality, for the sake of the love of money. Who knows, but I would grab a package that says "Marples" on it just in case.
Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AAvK said:

I noticed that. I've got the REAL Records - old stock. That's why I intentionally mentioned Record above.

Many dealers still have old stock, but I did notice Irwin on the new packages. Probably the death of another tool recommendation. The handles don't bother me, although they are a bit small. I use them to trim corners and shave wood - maintaining sharpness is more of a consideration for me. I wouldn't expect them to hold up to pounding with mallets and hammers, however.
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My teacher in woodshop (adult ed.) bought a new package of 4 Irwin BC's, other students are using them one after the other, they're holding up so far. I think they are cheap enough to risk trying it. The Irwin company really is lame for destroying Record too. They took Marples (not Jos.), Record and I believe Holland's Nooitgedagt tool company. I was lucky enough to get two of their shoulder planes new from eBay. Same seller is letting new wood handled Marples chisels go @ $2.95 each but, big time shipping each.
My local TV has only two, both original MBC @1/8", I think I'll get one.
Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@pobox.com says...

A claw hammer? Nails? Hardware store hand saw? Oh my!
She said woodworking not house framing. How about clamps, glue, and a nice back saw.
I don't know what universe your using your universal tools in but the only job a claw hammer, nails and a combination hardware store hand saw has in my shop is collecting dust.
--
MikeG
Heirloom Woods
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree. I want women doing woodwork for real, myself. Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I use a claw hammer in my workshop - nailing things up to make more workshop. Don't think I've ever _made_ anything with it, at least not a "product".
The hammer I use all day is an 8oz Japanese square-head. Fits in corners better, and I drive my chisels with it. I think I did use some nails once, but it was a long time ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 02:52:35 +0100, Andy Dingley

I've been using my 14 oz. urethane mallet on my chisels to square up the bottoms after the Shop Fox mortiser gets done with makin' holes. I -love- that mallet, and my wrists thank me. It absorbs about 80% of the force. Second is the 8 oz. Warrington.
Claw hammer? I tossed all the obnoxious critters, but I kept the fancy ($1.99) HF framing hammah and use her on construction jobs--like rebuilding the fascia and end-caps on the house.
-------------------------------------- PESSIMIST: An optimist with experience -------------------------------------------- www.diversify.com - Web Database Development
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mon, Oct 11, 2004, 10:59am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@pobox.com (BillMcNutt) burbled: <snip> the answer of "I dunno, what do you want to make?"
Which, if you would think about it, makes sense. I know of a person who makes his living with a pocketknife - carbing earrings out of wood. I know a person who makes a living using little more than that - carving life-like bird models. If you make wooden decks, a circular saw, framing square, pencil, and a hammer, are basically all you eed - though an air-nailer, and compressor, would help. You do just scrollsawing, then you can get buy with just a scrollsaw. You do chainsaw carving, you need a chainsaw. Now do you understand what we mean? Depends on what type of woodworking you want to do. There are, however, universal tools that all of us own, at least in general terms. All woodworking tools are task-based.
No kidding - see above.
There are three tasks in woodworking: measuring/marking stuff,
OK, a pencil and ruler takes care of that.
cutting stuff,
OK, depends on what you want to cut, and how you want to cut it.
and fastening stuff together.
Maybe. Some stuff I make is bolted together, some is just glued, some is held together by a wooden "key".
(Finishing is actually also necessary, but is generally treated as a separate process from "making."
Finish is optional at times.
To start, you will need a measuring tool. Guys here will talk about calipers, dividers, rules, rulers, and chalk-lines until you're blue in the face. But a simple Stanley tape measure will get you started. It will give you adequate accuracy for bird houses, book ends, and bookshelves. For a beginner, a 10' is probably adequate.
Chalkline? Whatcha doing, re-roofing houses? Ruler and pencil will get you started. I use a foot long ruler more often than any other measuring tool I have. If you're gonna get a tape measure, might's well get a 25 footer.
You will need a claw hammer. Again, my collegues will talk about mallets, nail guns, ball peens(!) and the like. You will want a hammer with curved claws for extracing nails. If you are slender-framed, get a 12 oz or 14 oz hammer. If you are beefier in build, you might consider a 16 ounce or 18 ounce head.
ROTFLMAO
You will need a saw. You can start out with a combination handsaw from any hardware store. It will allow you to make the basic crosscuts and rip cuts necessary for birdhouses and bookshelves.
Nah. I've got a book on birdhouses, and judging from some of the birdhouses, all you need is a basket or bag for for carrying scraps you find, and a hot glue gun.
You will also want a toolbox that you can store all this stuff in.
Drawer, shelf, hooks, or a closet floor, will work too - depending on what tools.
Please post any follow-up questions as you see fit.
Where do you get your ideas at?
Damn, not long ago I made a "craft stand", to hold a batch of clamps, and supplies, so I could work on gluing up and painting some projects in the house. I didn't know I need all that stuff to make it. I didn't even look at my claw hammer. I used plywood that was sliced when I bought it. About 11 7/8" X 48". I did cut pieces with my circular saw. But, it is 100% glued, no nails, so no hammer, no screws, so no screwdriver. I did use two types of clamps while putting it together. And, it doesn't have any finish at all. It's about 3' tall, with 3 shelves. I did put casters on the bottom, but used a small wrench to turn the hex head screws in. Works just as designed. Gonna make a few changes, but those'll be made by gluing small pieces of scrap in place.
Clamps are always good tho, but you can make those too.
Like we said, the tools you need, depends on what you want to do.
JOAT I smile because I know my God loves me. You on the other hand, he doesn't much like.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.