If the Bosch 1590EVSK will cut steel, will it cut...


ceramic tile?
I just ordered one from Coastal Tool, and am eagerly looking forward to it replacing my Skil jigsaw (won't go as far as to call it a POS, but blade deflection is routine - not capable of precise cuts at all, esp. in knotty or figured wood).
But I got to wondering if I could use it - w/ the proper blade - to cut 1/4" ceramic porcelain? What WOULD a proper blade be? And what would be the right type of bit (material) to drill a starter hole for cutting interior holes in a tile?
Thanks much, Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1 Sep 2005 17:10:57 -0700, "TheNewGuy"

You bet. Get a carbide grit blade. Won't give you as clean a cut as diamond, but works fine for the occasional odd size cut.
If you've got a lot of tile to cut, and the cuts are straight, get (or rent) a real tile saw.
A carbide tipped masonary drill bit will drill a starter hole. Put a piece of masking tape on first to prevent the bit from sliding all over while you're getting it started.
HTH,
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks Paul, that's just the info I needed.
We are borrowing a real tile saw from a friend who owns one for all the straight cuts. But for a few places where water supply lines come through, I was hoping the jigsaw could do the job. ... I suppose it might depend on how tight a radius I want to cut, eh? Any thoughts on the practical limit of how small a circle I could cut? ... I guess it would be good for the toilet waste pipe, but water supply lines might only require such a small opening as to make the jigsaw not practical?
-Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1 Sep 2005 19:48:58 -0700, "TheNewGuy"

You can nibble away a small hole for the supply lines using the grit blade. Because the grit is a bit wider than the blade it will sort of cut on the sides a bit too.
There are a couple of alternatives.
The pro's would use a carbide, or more likely, a diamond hole saw of the appropriate diameter. Might not be worth buying one for one job, but you can rent if you have a good rental place nearby. The diamond ones are pricey, but the carbide ones not so bad.
You can also get a carbide grit rod saw that fits into a hacksaw frame. It's a piece of heavy wire coated with carbide grit and it cuts in any direction. You would drill a small hole first, thread the rod saw through, and then attach to the frame and saw away. Describing it is more work than doing it; it really goes pretty fast.
Final alternative is a roto-zip with a carbide grit masonry bit. This will drill it's own starting hole and then allow you to make the cutout. A little tricky to control accurately, but for a rough hole for plumbing, good enough. The roto-zip will set you back more than a hole saw by several times, but it's a pretty handy tool to have if you are planning on a lot of remodeling or rennovation, especially if it involves drywall work.
Good luck,
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for all the great info, Paul.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

you can also get the equivalent of a scroll saw blade that is coated with diamonds.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Get the proper sized hole saw with carbide grit cutting edges. Use plumber's putty to make a water dam around the hole, and cut the tile on your messy bench, or on your drill press.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Look on the coastal tool website. http://tinyurl.com/bf2bj
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doh! Too bad I didn't ask this question before placing my order w/ Coastal :^) Oh well. Thanks for the pointer.
-Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What you want is a Fein Multimaster XL. THAT little rascal is made for doing such things with precision and finesse. Carbide grout blade.
Or a DeWalt 4.5" low angle grinder with a continous grit dry diamond blade. And a ShopVac to clean up the fine dust that WILL get into everything.
I really like my Bosch jigsaw, but I wouldn't want the dust from tile cutting inside of it.
Wear a dust mask when cutting tile, unless you're using a wet saw.
Patriarch, whose bathroom remodel, as of 1 pm today, is officially functional. Only the mirror remains to be framed & hung.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Patriarch wrote:

Next project :)

I'll keep that in mind. When I can, I do the highly-dust-producing tasks outside, and for the couple/few tiles I need to makes holes in, I can certainly do that. Sometimes I even setup a fan to make a forced cross-wind to whisk dust away from me/tool. Dustmask not optional (nor are earplugs and eye protection...)
Congrats on the bathroom remodel completion! Ours is hopefully not too far behind. Finishing the wainscoting, then on to the floor: self-leveling compound for the couple low spots in the ply subfloor; backerboard; tile layout and cutting and laying, (etc., etc., ...)
-Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

blade.
My son went nuts when he saw this picture:
http://www.anneldavis.com/bobandanne/cooktop/cooktop6.jpg . He's a safety nut and he chewed me out for not having a dust mask. In retrospect, it was supremely stupid. That was two years ago. Now I look like a spaceman when I suit up to do dusty work like this. Then there's the roar of the shop vac and overhead dust filter running which is mitigated by my Worktunes hearing protection.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm sure that a powerful router like a 1590 could easily cut ceramic tile (with the right bit).
Heck, I just remodeled one of our bathrooms and for those tiles that needed odd cuts and round notches, I used a Dremel. That little Dremel chewed through the tile like butter.
Jack
TheNewGuy wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.