ideal power switch

I've been pondering this as I use the various tools in my shop. I've thought of some qualities my "ideal" power switch would have, and I thought I'd share my thoughts.
* Recessed ON button. I don't mean "has a collar around it" I mean "inside the switch body". Nothing I can bump by accident, or get something caught on.
* Small ON button. Big enough for a finger to push, not big enough for anything else to push.
* Protruding OFF button. Stick it way out. I want to be able to shut the tools off *fast* and *easily*, with whatever happens to be available to hit that button with. I usually slap mine with the palm of my hand while keeping my attention on the whirling sharp parts.
* OFF button sticks out further than the ON button. Yes, this should be implicit from the above, but it's important - if I hit the switch with the palm of my hand, I want the tool OFF.
* Bigger OFF then ON button. I want to be sure I'm hitting the right one when groping around while keeping my eyes on the wood and blades.
* Turns OFF and stays OFF when power is lost. If I hit the ON button while the tool is unplugged, it should NOT turn on if I then plug it in.
I know people will say I should mention locking switches, but I kill the shop's whole subpanel at the main breaker panel when needed.
Ok folks, add your ideas!
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DJ Delorie wrote:

All of those are satisfied by these magnetic switches with overload control. The downside is that they cost around $100.
http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid 364
For quite a bit less you can get these but they don't have a recessed "on" button.
http://www.grizzly.com/products/110V-Magnetic-On-Off-Switch/H8240
If you're willing to forgo the last requirement, this one has a big "off" paddle.
http://www.grizzly.com/products/110-220V-Paddle-On-Off-Switch/H8243
Chris
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Wish I could afford that :-P

Surprizingly, it's my Grizzly tools that tend to be close to what I want - the recessed on switch with the protruding off switch. The Delta bandsaw has the collared on switch, so you can't just smack it. It looks like this one: http://www.grizzly.com/products/H8238

Sweet.
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"DJ Delorie" wrote:

<snip a rehash of the punch press push button system mandated by OSHA in the 70's.>
Start with an enclosed 60 amp contactor, 2P for single phase, 3P for 3 phase, complete with at least one aux contact, add momentary push buttons with desired guards which are available as standard from the push button mfg, install and get a beer to celebrate.
Lew

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That could control my whole shop!
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"DJ Delorie" wrote: .

Sounds like you need to guy more stuff<grin>.
Lew
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I can only use so many tools at a time. I have a bunch of 20 amp 240v outlets throughout the shop (one breaker per outlet); 60 amps gives me a dust collector, one of the big tools, with leftovers for lights and a few minor accessories.
Not that I think buying more stuff is a bad idea ;-)
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"DJ Delorie" wrote:

Seriously, what you are looking for us undervoltage protection.
The only way to get that is to equip each tool with a magnetic contactor and a set of start-stop PB's.
A 2P-25A, definite purpose contactor, should be less than $20 + enclosure which will give you a holding contact and a power pole for a single phase application. You will need a 3 wire hook up for 120V control.
Have fun.
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Mon, Feb 11, 2008, 3:03pm From: snipped-for-privacy@delorie.com (DJDelorie) I've been pondering this as I use the various tools in my shop. I've thought of some qualities my "ideal" power switch would have, and I thought I'd share my thoughts. <snip>
Cable out? How about a red switch, pull up on the bottom to turn it on, push it down to shut it off. It's on my Craftsman bandsaw.
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I do not have a problem with a woman president - except for Hillary.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) writes:

Do any of those automatically shut themselves off if the power fails? The ones I've seen are just mechanical switches.
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Mon, Feb 11, 2008, 11:05pm snipped-for-privacy@delorie.com (DJDelorie) doth sayeth: Do any of those automatically shut themselves off if the power fails? The ones I've seen are just mechanical switches.
So? Do it the way you're supposed to - shut it off manuallly. I don't like relying on a gimmick to keep me from being hurt.
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DJ Delorie wrote:

Grizzly has single phase magnetic contactors for $44 to $80.
http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2008/Main/246
They list "magnetic on-off switches" for $8 - $11 on the same page but for the price I doubt they shut down on power failure.
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Jack Novak
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Absent recurring visits from OSHA, what's the problem you are trying to solve?
Does your power recycle on a regular basis? If so, better to address that issue than replace a switch or two.
Thinking of the controls on my power tools (like the Craftsman TS mentioned) I have never accidentally started a tool.
I did start a PC690 once that hadn't been tightened down in the router table - new power cord!
That said, if I were building something that "took" a switching mechanism, the http://www.grizzly.com/products/110V-Magnetic-On-Off-Switch/H8240 looks like a good buy (if a little bulky) and the http://www.grizzly.com/products/110-220V-Paddle-On-Off-Switch/H8243 looks lke a good buy and an easy fit into standard electrical oxes. For those (which I bookmarked) I must thank you for the question.
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Not trying to solve a problem. Trying to start a conversation.
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A magnetic switch will stay off in case out a temporary power outage. For my table saw, I constructed a shut off board (from a piece of oak pallet wood) with a hinge on top and a hole where the ON button is located. Depending on how the off board swings, fasten a black of wood that touches the off button. I drilled two small holes and tapped them on the fence rail. This works great and I can quickly/easily turn off the saw with my knee.
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