Hybrid Tablesaws

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Greetings,
I'm considering upgrading from my current contractor saw to a hybrid saw. I'm hope to gain improved dust collection because of the enclosed cabinet and a smaller footprint than my current saw (a craftsman 10inch contractor). I'm limited to 115v in my shop.
Do any of you have experience with the Delta 36-717? The reviews seem mixed on Amazon... that makes me nervous. Would you recommend a hybrid saw by another manufacturer?
I apologize if this has been discussed, I did some searches without success.
Regards, Mike
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Mike Howland wrote:

Check out this 'modofied' contractor saw from Jet. The dust collection is supposed to be much better than a standard contractor saw. I don't have one so can't say.
http://www.wmhtoolgroup.com/shop/index.cfm?navPage=4&iid `56005
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RayV wrote:

I just bought this saw last month and I couldn't be happier. I got a pretty good price on it ($399.99) at Woodcraft. The saw is sweet but I have to say I am going to string a 220 line and convert the motor to 220 as sson as I can. This thing really sucks the juice. That said, it works like a charm with my shop vac hooked up to it.
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I am not sure about the Delta but many Hybrids require Hybrid Accessories. Something to think about when buying.
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On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 20:24:45 GMT, "Leon"

What are you talking about? The first thing I did with my hybrid from General was buy a JessEm miter gauge. It's works just fine. Nothing "hybrid" about that miter gauge.
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wrote:

Reread what I said.
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On Fri, 15 Dec 2006 05:39:09 GMT, "Leon"

I read it. I don't see why any hybrid would require any different accessories from any other saw, contractor's or cabinet, as you say.
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I don't either but the original DeWalts came with a fence that you could not change out. Some used different sized miter slots.
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Mike Howland wrote:

Do yourself a favor.
Go to Sears and look CLOSELY at the 22104, 22114 and 22124 saws.
Wonderful, well-performing saws built by Orion, which is run by ex-Delta folks.
These saws can often be had at deep discounts.
I've had a 22114 for a few years now and couldn't be happier.
Good Luck
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Ditto. I have the 22114.
Gus wrote:

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On Fri, 08 Dec 2006 15:44:00 -0800, ibarakicho wrote:

How rigid is the fence on that?
I was looking at a 22114 in the Sears store the other day, on the one in the store the fence had a good deal of flex in it, compared to the Biesemeyer on the saw next to it that had no give at all, and compared to a Ridgid at Home Depot across the street that felt like it was welded down. I could grab the back end and wiggle it an eighth of an inch or more easily but it felt like springing rather than something slipping.
Now, I'm fully prepared to believe that the people in the store didn't assemble it correctly or didn't sock down all the fasteners, and am wondering if that is in fact the case, hence my question.

--
--John
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I got a canvas bag from Harbor Fright for $5 and added snaps to saw and bag for about three dollars. I have to empty it, of course, but it does collect lots of saw dust!
If you can get a "collar" sized to fit your shop vac, add it to the bottom of the bag (its the weight,, dear) and you can suck the dust out of it (next project).
Much cheaper than a new saw if the old one cuts well enough for you!

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Just curious. Why are you limited to 115V?
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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Stoutman wrote:

Greetings!
Strictly speaking I'm not limited to 115v... My Oneida dust collector is wired for 220. I just wanted to avoid running a new line. I have a dedicated 20a 115v line I use for my tablesaw and wanted to keep exploiting it since it's already there.
My big concern is the dust collection. I've found my contractor saw to have enough cutting power (Craftsman model 113.299410, contractor saw). The open back makes it messy.. even with the DC pulling air.
The hybrids seem to address this concern... at least somewhat. I was just curious about what folks thought. The hybrids also seem to have a slightly smaller footprint. I *am* somewhat limited in space so a full-blown unisaw is out of the question, I'm afraid and if the hybrid was slightly smaller, all the more room for me in the shop.
Thanks to all the posters! I appreciate the feedback,
Regards, Mike
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Mike Howland wrote:

Regarding the "footprint." The table top and fence will be larger than the base of the saw. A table that is not very deep is going to make cutting stock difficult. The length of the fence is independent of the saw when your comparing a cabinet saw to a hybrid to a cabinet saw.
AM Wood
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Mike, if you've got the $, I believe you will find that for the same fence rail length, the Unisaw will have a slightly SMALLER footprint than a standard belt-drive, motor-in-the-back contractor's saw.
--
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net wrote:

I hadn't considered that. I will have to give them a closer look. My shop space is in my basement (about 33' x 13') so every inch is precious.
Thanks again all for all the replies, Regards, Mike
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Mike Howland wrote:

For 1/2 the price you can get a used unisaw that's much more sturdy and has a 110/220 volt motor. But if you have the extra bucks to spend on a lesser piece of equipment go for it. Plus the new saw will be more pretty and shiney and the wood does care.
AM Wood
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I wasn't aware of a 110v Unisaw. Enlightenment, please.
Patriarch, who paid a bunch to rewire for 220v and other stuff...
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Patriarch wrote:

Not sure what you want to see for proof other than the hundreds of thousands of unisaws made with IR 110/220 motors.
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