hvlp versus llvlp

thinking about getting a pain sprayer but not sure about the up or down side
for small stuff i use spray paint cans and usually just clear coat
for bigger stuff i use a brush or wipe on
from what i have read so far auto paint guys like the hvlp so they can shoot a lot on quickly
that is what i do not require so i am looking at lvlp and i have even seen mention of lvmp
spray paint cans cost way too much so i think a lvlp setup will save a lot of money in the long run
but maybe i am wrong and there is something i have overlooked
how much use can be expected from a mid-quality spray gun
what wears out is it the tips that clog or wear out
also since i will be shooting water base does a water trap really matter
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On 2/10/2016 5:16 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Seems only like there would be a down side to a "pain" sprayer.
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On 2/10/2016 5:16 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

What you use it for will dictate the answer.
If the use is going to be general woodworking in a small shop, look no further:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
I have the older Earlex 5000 model, and would not hesitate to buy it again.
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One thing to consider - how much are you using it.
I like my HVLP unit - a street level model. I don't make a living that way. I use one several times a year for an hour or so max. I've been pleased every time I use it.
The paint store should know what you are using - and if painting steel then add anti-rust.
My small business is now dormant (I'm 68) and I will be using it to paint a wood building we have on the property. The outside is pro-painted and the back and inside needs work. I paint my lawn tools and whatever I have handy when running out of quality paint. I have black and white tools. My pick-axe is white, shovel is black....
Clean. Clean. Make sure you keep the gun clean and you won't look back.
Martin
On 2/10/2016 5:16 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

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On Wed, 10 Feb 2016 21:14:19 -0600

i think i will use it enough that i will save money right away

seems that spraying clean soapy water thru after then follow with clean water should keep it clean
i only use water based but i wonder if i need to clean with more than just soap and water
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On 2/11/2016 12:23 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

What I do, YMMV:
Clean it well with water and dish soap, rinse well, then run acetone through the gun, and wipe down all the parts with it.
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I mostly spray acrylic on pro paint jobs, but home is just the quality water based paint. If I need special coating I use a Car paint can or lessor then a quality paint can. e.g. cold spray galvanize. Oil based rust preventing paints.
But wood I'll use exterior house pro paint unless it is for inside.
Martin
On 2/11/2016 12:23 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

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On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 21:58:42 -0600

i will be trying a variety of water based products once i get the spray gun i also have used interior products on exterior stuff and then coated with an exterior clear finish
not large scale though
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