How to round over edges?

Hello,
I'm in the process of making the following project and would like some advice on how to go about rounding over some of the edges of the pieces.
http://www.meiselwoodhobby.com/cgi-bin/webplus.exe?script=/shop/item.wml&groupid=2&prodid=W2232&deptid &SessionID 071215103612161
If word wrap causes a problem, the project can be seen by searching for plan W2232 at www.meiselwoodhobby.com
The stock is only 3/4" pine, so I don't think that rounding over the edges with a router would be the correct method to use. Too great of a chance for tear out. Also, due to its design, it would be hard to access all of the edges that way. Not that all edges need to be rounded over, but it would make it easier to "decorate" them according to the particular holiday.
With that in mind, I thought of just filing over the particular edges as long as I don't use a file that's too aggressive. Another thought would be to simply use a sanding block with 120 grit sandpaper and just break the edges. Any suggestions?
I realize that this isn't rocket science. It's just that I don't want to ruin the project at this stage and have to start all over again. I would like to have it ready by Christmas. All of the parts have already been cut out and just need to be assembled and painted, which can begin once I figure out how to round over the edges.
Thanks in advance to those who post a reply to the group.
Peter.
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Peter Bogiatzidis wrote:

http://www.meiselwoodhobby.com/cgi-bin/webplus.exe?script=/shop/item.wml&groupid=2&prodid=W2232&deptid &SessionID 071215103612161

I wish that site had been around when I had kids. "Make your own children and decorate them with size 18 month clothes which you can pick up inexpensively at garage sales." Helliuva lot easier than raising them for real.
Anyway, I found this. It might be a bit of a rush to get them shipped in time for Xmas, but you may also find them locally. I think this kind of thing is what you're looking for. Or you could use any or the other ideas you talked about above. This might be a bit cleaner on the final product.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p2682&cat=1,41182,41200
FWIW, I'd use a router. Sometimes tearout can be an issue at the ends, but if you use a guide pin and/or a decent way to hold the small parts, it shouldn't be a problem. However, that Lee Valley tool will eliminate the danger.
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Tanus

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"Peter Bogiatzidis" wrote

The proper tool would be a pattern maker's rasp, but a good one would cost three times the cost of the "kids" at W2232.
Sandpaper is probably your best bet to "roundover" without causing damage that you can't fix, starting at 60 to 80 grit, and going up to 150 - 180 ... if all you really want to do is "break the edges", start and end with 220 grit.
Practice first on a piece of scrap and see which grits give you the best bang for the buck on your wood as far a time involved, and desired smoothness of the edges.
The quality of the sandpaper will make a big difference. Norton's 3X is available at most big box stores and is an excellent consumer grade sandpaper.
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On Sat, 15 Dec 2007 17:02:45 GMT, "Peter Bogiatzidis"

As "busy" as those silhouettes are, I think a router makes absolute sense. Sure, you may wind up having to do some manual work as follow up, but if you think about it, those relatively inaccessible places aren't likely to snag cloth, either.
The key is to use a small radius bit (1/8" or 1/4", I would think) and even at that, don't take the full profile--just use enough to soften the edge--maybe 2/3rds of it.

File, sanding block--that's a lot of work. You'll still want to do some, perhaps, as described above, but I'd do the bulk of it with the router.
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LRod

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wrote:

Forgot to mention (Tarus reminded me); for those areas where you're really worried about tear out (and that should be quite rare if you follow my advice in the above post) you can always climb cut the at-risk areas. The very small "bite" of the small radius bit won't be agressive enough to affect your control of the router, and it will reduce the risk of tear out to virtually nil.
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LRod

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You haven't really said how much rounding over you need and how much material you will be removing. If it's a small amount, I've always had good results with a small detail sander which is controllable and versatile due to different grits available. Maybe something like
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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wrote:

I always climb cut my small roundovers and chamfers. Nothing at all to worry about, with perfect results.
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