How do you minimize rust on your jointer or table saw?

Page 1 of 2  
How do you either prevent or minimize rust on the machined cast iron surfaces of your jointer, table saw, etc? I have tried Butcher's wax with sort of OK results. Is there a better way?
TIA
Dick Snyder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dick Snyder" wrote

TopCote:
http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM 6-725&gclid=CIiKwv3nvZYCFSCysgodNS7UyA
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/18/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM 6-725&gclid=CIiKwv3nvZYCFSCysgodNS7UyA
now.
Dick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dick Snyder" wrote

You'll find it to be just what you're looking for. It works very well here on the Gulf Coast, which speaks volumes for it's rust protection.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

over 25%. I have a humidifier that keeps the inside at that number. I do get tired of feeling like a potato chip however.     ;-/     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jo4hn wrote:

Swingman's right on the money. TopCote is the way to go, and that is true even in the desert. Besides preventing rust, it makes a super slick surface that lasts a long time. Slippery is good on woodworking machinery.
When I first started woodworking, and my shop was in the basement of my first house, the basement would leak every time it rained. Needless to say rust was a major issue. I used everything, car wax, candle wax, I even melted wax in lacquer thinner and painted it on, still, rust would show up in no time as wood sliding would wear it off quickly. Then, one fine day a buddy of mine who worked for 3M got me a can of 3M Dry Lubricant. This stuff was amazing. One quick spray and the surface was slick as ice on a warm day. One coat lasted me 6 months at least and zero rust. When I ran out of it years later, I could no longer get the stuff, I even contacted 3M and sent a picture of the can, no luck. Recently I bought a can of Bostik TopCote and I think it's the same stuff, the can is even the same color.
Wax is NOT the way to go, even though a ton of people use Johnson's paste wax. I guess it's OK in a pinch, but it is not as durable as this stuff, not as slick as this stuff, not as easy to apply as this stuff and doesn't prevent rust as well as this stuff. TopCote has no downside to it that I can find as long as you don't set yourself on fire or use it as an inhaler...
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://Motzarella.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What is topcoat anyway?
WWers are frugal -- surely there is an alternative that's pennies per use..

http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM 6-725&gclid=CIiKwv3nvZYCFSCysgodNS7UyA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Uhhh.... have had my $9 can of Topcote for 10 years. Still got a lot in the can. Table saw, jointer, band saw, planer. All rust free in a basement. Southern WI.
Prolly is pennies per use.
D'ohBoy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 24 Oct 2008 13:49:13 -0500, "Kevin"

I don't know what it is (top cote) but it works. The guy I work with says it smells like the stuff they use to spray in bowling shoes. I think it's some kind of powder, like talc, with a propellant.
Mike O.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kevin wrote:

TopCote is a bunch of chemicals and petroleum stuff designed to put on iron table tops, like table saws and jointers.

Some are, but from the money guys on here throw around on Festools and so on they seem less than frugal when it comes to their tools.
-- surely there is an alternative that's pennies per use..
If you find one, let us know. Wax is not it, I've used wax. Truth is, TopCote is around $10 a can, and that should last years. Not bad for having a super slick surface and no rust to deal with. The most dangerous thing in your shop is rusty tables or any non-slick top. Once you see how nice things slide on this stuff and how long it lasts, you won't worry about spending $10 every year or two on a can.
--
Jack
Using FREE News Server: http://Motzarella.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is a way that works for me and found it out quite by accident. I live in northern Minnesota where temps. very from 90 in the summer to -30 in the winter. When it gets to cold to work in the garage I move my operations to the basement but there is machinery that is left in the garage all year long such as my table saw, bandsaw, thickness planer etc. I had come to the conclusion that I was just going to struggle cleaning off the rust from these items every year. Well, to my surprise when spring came around and I was getting things set up in the garage again, I found an 8" mill bastard file that I had left on top of my tablesaw. When I lifted it up, there was no rust. That was interesting. Over the last few years I have just covered those items using blankets or what ever that lay flat on the surface. It is not "completely" free of rust but it has cut down its presents tremendously. To clean the surfaces quickly, I use WD40 and a block of wood with 320 grit sandpaper. Wipe clean with a paper towel or cloth and then sprinkle and rub baby powder over the surface. I can have all this done in 30-45 minutes. I can't say that this will work in all parts of the country but it does here. Try it and good luck.
John

CFSCysgodNS7UyA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dick Snyder wrote:

Boeshield or Bostik Top Cote
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 23 Oct 2008 16:44:44 GMT, "Dick Snyder"

Personally, I just make sure I live in the desert...
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've found that rubbing them with wood gets rid of it.
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've found that rubbing them with wood gets rid of it.
John Martin
:-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The most important thing you can do is use daily. Second to that wax them. Any old candle will do.
I also have some cheap moving blankets I got at HF that I use to cover the table tops I toss them over the tables when they are not covered with other stuff. I'm not sure if it makes a difference or not, but I sleep better knowing my tools are comfortable.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
news:ce7a1261-f776-496f-a339-
The most important thing you can do is use daily. Second to that wax them. Any old candle will do.
I also have some cheap moving blankets I got at HF that I use to cover the table tops I toss them over the tables when they are not covered with other stuff. I'm not sure if it makes a difference or not, but I sleep better knowing my tools are comfortable.
If you use a heating pad they will be much more comfortable.
Seriously though, I would think if the blankets aren't breathable, they will trap in moisture thus hindering the actual intentions of their use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use Johnson's Paste Wax and a dehumidifier in the shop, which works very well for me in Indianapolis. If you're in Houston, Seattle, or Miami, for example, it may not work so well for you -- but I'm guessing that if you've had "sort of OK results" with wax alone, that wax and a dehumidifier would probably do the trick.
The dehumidifier's a good idea anyway, if your shop is in a significantly more humid location (outdoors, or in a basement) than the living areas of your house. Assuming, that is, that you use the shop primarily for making things that eventually wind up in the living areas of the house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

I too use Johnson's Paste Wax. So far, so good. There's only two things allowed on top of my saw: Wax and Wood. That helps tremendously in keeping the saw top in good condition.
The saw does not get rolled out into the driveway if I'm trying to beat the weather on a project. I had just a few rain drops hit the top and it caused oranging immediately.
I'm almost directly west of Doug, about 150 miles.
Puckdropper
--
If you're quiet, your teeth never touch your ankles.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Sounds like you're in or near Decatur.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.