How do I slow down my ryobi bandsaw

I have the Ryobi vertical bandsaw approximate cost $99. I have a hack saw style blade 28+- teeth. At the speed the saw moves it doesn't cut for crap, burns wood, heats up metal. And before I get flamed yes I know you shouldn't use a 28 tpi blade to cut wood in this thing. However, I would like to be able to slow down the speed so it operates more like my portable band saw from Milwaukee. I tried a router speed control from Harbor Freight, but the band saw must have a soft start as the speed control didn't work.
Any ideas how to slow this thing down?
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The reason the speed control doesn't work is that the saw has an induction motor. Those speed controls only work on universal or DC motors. You're only option are a pulley change or a gearbox.
<Matt In Fenton> wrote in message

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Bummer. Without doing a major modification looks like I'm out of luck. But what if I swapped out the motor?
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Matt In Fenton wrote:

Try slowing your feed rate and lowering your expectations.
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Both good ideas. But if I told you I had a solution to your speed problem for about $20, would you be interested? The only solution I see is to get an appropriate blade. I bet your 28 tpi blade is fine for cutting 1/4" ply, but for anything thicker than that, call Iturra designs (866-883-8064) and get a real blade. Or suffolk machinery (http:// www.suffolkmachinery.com/silicon_steel_pricing.asp) or any other place that will weld up a blade to your length, if you can't find a replacement blade at HD. Really not trying to flame here, but why are you willing to fight with a speed control and whatever else, when it sounds like you know the real solution? Good luck, Andy
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Sorry - must have missed the fact that you're cutting aluminum. My above response applies to cutting WOOD with a bandsaw - for some reason, I just assumed that's what you were talking about on this newsgroup. Andy
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Andy,
I cut both. I mentioned the aluminum because the material isn't as forgiving as wood and it served as a better example. But the purpose behind the thread wasn't really about cutting anything, it was merely a question about how I would be able to slow the saw down. I think once the question as to WHY I wanted to slow it down was asked the conversation drifted away from the topic.
Thanks for the help though it's appreciated :)

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On Sun, 25 Mar 2007 03:24:00 GMT, Lobby Dosser

Well part of the issue is when I try to cut aluminum.(quarter inch plate) It's a catch 22 situation. I thought a higher tooth blade would give me a cleaner cut, but at the "default" speed of this it sort of bounces and doesn't cut. So I talked to a shop and they said to drop to a lower tooth blade. I did that and it cut better but the cut wasn't very clean it was almost "chunking" the metal out. When machining metal there are two factors, speed and feed. I can slow feed, it's the speed I want to slow as well. But at the time I bought it I hadn't had any experience in machining.
It seems my only alternative is to put a higher tooth blade back in and use it for wood only.
Hmm, now that I think about it. I think my father put my grandfather's vertical bandsaw in the barn. If I remember correctly it runs off a DC motor attached to a pully. This actually might work for cutting metal and I'll leave mine for wood.
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They didn't laugh at you? That was a truly professional CS person.
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16 TPI is about right for 1/4" aluminum. Always want three teeth in the cut, otherwise it starts "chunking" as you put it.
<Matt in Fenton> wrote in message

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<Matt In Fenton> wrote:

IIRC the small Ryobi has a direct drive induction motor. There is no practical, inexpensive way to vary the speed of this motor. Direct drive means pulley changes are not possible either. For the cost of modifications to make this saw variable speed, you could buy a whole bunch of blades suitable for your needs- Or, have a significant amount of money to use for the purchase of a larger, more capable saw.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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Matt In Fenton wrote in

have you tried lubricating the blade. Ive got onto 50% chain saw bar oil, 50% kerosene and wood cuts very much easier. a small spray bottle to start with to see if it works, and later Ill rig up a car window washer setup to make it easier. not too much liquid though.
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