how do i groove parting bead

The parting bead that separates the 2 sashes in an old window needs to be replaced. The wood itself is a stock item, but it needs to be grooved to accept the zink knife edge flashing. The upper half would be grooved on the outside, the lower half on the inside. These grooves are considerably narrower than the kerf on my table saw blade. What is the best way to make them?
Thanks,
Henry
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slot cutter and a router table? and lots of carefull?
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On Tue, 07 Sep 2004 19:07:44 GMT, "news.verizon.net"

wing cutter type slitter on the router table.
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news.verizon.net" snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net
wrt groving parting bead
A hand method would be some form of scratch stock. E. g. Take a stick of hardwood, one by one by eight inches or so. Rip 2/3 of it to 1/2 in. and crosscut that off. The shoulder just made will be the fence that runs along the side of the bead. Make a steel cutter that you set through the 1/2 in section left, set in centered at 1/2 the width of the bead to be scratched. The cutter could be the shaped (file, grind) end of a six penny nail, or some carbon steel--shank of an Allen key, maybe, for examples. Hammer flatten the cutter first. That will get you an easier piece to final shape. Tap that in (drill an undersized starter hole) just deep enough so that it is proud of the stock the same depth you want for your bead slit. Run it along the bead--which you may have to support on a runner attached to the bench, don't know, enough times to make the full depth of slit that the scratch stock allows. There are variations. Frank Morrison
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Fdmorrison wrote:

Good advice. My own variation is to take a newish Stanley wooden marking gage (should cost about $10 at the hardware store) and convert that to a scratch stock. Back out the pin from the arm, rip a vertical slot in the arm, drill one hole horizontally all the way through the arm/slot (near the end of the beam/arm) and drill one halfway through (further back on the arm).
Then take some scraper stock, cut a small piece off and shape to the desired contour (chainsaw files are handy for this). Put that piece in the slot, and fix it in place with a flat-bottomed machine screw sized to the hole you drilled. Take another machine screw and a nut, and use them in the through-hole near the end of the arm, to hold the kerf closed.
Presto, you have a scratch stock with an adjustable fence. You can make any profile your heart desires from leftover scraper stock.
Chuck Vance
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Don't use the zink flashing. Install the parting bead and paint the edges.The original parting bead was grooved with a wheel knife in a tablesaw. If you must use the flashing, saw it by hand with a veneer saw or the extremely thin hobby saws found at craft stores. mike
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Just buy a thin-kerf 51/2" circular saw blade with a 5/8" arbor hole, the kerf works for plastic strips, it's about 1/16"
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