How did he do this???

I remember seeing this thread a while ago - and just cant find it on google.
My wife saw this cutting board on ebay : http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item#75422927&category 638
Any idea how he does this?
Thanks Rob
You can reply to me at r_b_v at v_e_r_z_e_r_a doht c_o_m
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Place the light colored board over the darker(walnut)or other way(doesn't matter) with double sided tape, secure and cut whatever pattern with bandsaw. Glue the darker where the lighter was cut out. Not really that difficult if you think about it. Larry
--
Lawrence L'Hote
Columbia, MO
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That is true for the pieces which go all the way across the board, however if you need an inlay which is surrounded completely by wood then you need a zero-kerf(TM) blade. However, there is a trick that will help. Tilt the table so that the outside of the cut on the bottom is directly under the inside cut of the top piece. Then the cut out from the bottom will fit exactly into the hole in the piece in the top with no gap.
-Jack
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You mean the tight, lamination of random patterns? Just cut both boards at the same time. Someone suggested a bandsaw. Would that give a nice enough edge to join? If not, just rough cut the pattern on the band saw, clamp the boards so the widest gap is, say, 7/16", then run a 1/2 router bit down the gap. As long as you keep the bit contacting both boards, you end up with perfectly matched edges.
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Badly ? That thing's just ugly.
You have to make these things in pairs, and you'll need a saw (scrollsaw or bandsaw) that can cut a pretty narrow kerf (easier with a narrow blade like a scroll saw).
Mark the most interestingly figured board with a pencil for your cut lines. These might follow some figure etc., or just be a pleasing shape. But do it in pencil first, not with the saw, or you'll make an ugly like this.
Then you lay the two boards on top of each other and stick them together with a strip of DS tape at each end. Don't rely on clamps, glue them right across (some people use a wide bead of hot melt across the end grain).
Now "rip" them into strips. Follow your pencil lines. Lightly sand the eges, just enough to take the saw marks out.
Swap alternate strips around, glue and clamp up.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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