Homier

Homier is in San Antonio. Just gotta weed through the junk & find the usable stuff. Good deals in some cases.
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God no! You might as well flush your money down the toilet. I bought a reciprocating saw that broke the first time I used it. I bought some bar clamps that do not hold. I bought some drills that seem like they didn't bother to put an edge on them. I could go on, but it is too upsetting.
My tape measure hasn't broken yet, but that's about it.
I thought they were like Harbor Freight but just better prices. NO NO NO As bad a Harbor Freight is, the stuff at least works. I didn't know any better (though I darn well should have suspected!) but you do now.
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Funny story. I bought two sets of drill bits from Homier last year - something like a 29 bit set for 8 bucks. The first time I used one, it bent 90 degrees! Never did break. I tried another. And another. EVERY bit in the box bent 90 degrees. I laughed my ass off, kissed that 16 bucks goodbye and wrote off Homier to never get any of my money again.

you
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Don't feel too badly, Seen the same Chinese drill bits sell at an auction for $40. All 10 sets were claimed.........
--
Chipper Wood

useours, yours won't work
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I've had relatively good luck with them so far. Got my 14" bandsaw at one of their shows and I'm pretty happy with it. Bar clamps are working ok for me (one of the plastic jaw protectors broke but I think I dropped that one on the concrete floor) bought some forstner bits and plug cutters from them that seem to be holding up. I've also had luck buying from a competing traveling tool show called Cummins tools.
YMMV I suppose.:)
Bob G. www.i2k.com/~rjgoniea/
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Rule of thumb: if it has to be plugged into the wall, it might not be a good tool. Tarps, bungees, you know, things that are hard to make poorly, are OK from what I have found. I've had ok luck with the skil saw blades (great for outdoor lumber, etc.)

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Only thing I've had good luck with was their mobile bases..kinda small but solid..put one under my jointer and one under my router table...oh yeah, their double halogen shop lite is ok too...anything else..NG... walt
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Very good, still being used or consumed as expected: --3 HP Plunge Router, complete/accessories, wrenches & 2 bits. -- Drill bit Sharpener -- Torque Wrench, ft-lbs with 1/4 & 3/8 & 1/2 drives -- Paint can pourers -- Tap & Die set, #4 to 3/4" -- US Flag 3 x 5 -- 3 ton floor jack for garage -- 8 ton bottle jacks -- 5' floor jacks, twist type -- Cable Ties, assorted sizes, several hundred total -- Assorted Bungee Cords, clothesline, anchor rope -- 4" bench vise -- Multimeter -- Hi tension wire for test leads -- TS Outfeed rollers with stand -- Wrist watches for kids' gifts @ $0.49 ea -- Set of Vise Grips -- Set of square drives -- Shop rage - soft flannel type - now washed many times, still going strong. Well,except a couple I got glue all over {-). -- and that's all that comes to mind at a moment's notice but there's lots more. You HAVE TO KNOW WHAT YOU ARE BUYING AND BE ABLE TO TELL WHTHER IT WILL MEET YOUR EXPECTATIONS, OR KNOW THAT YOU ARE TAKING A CHANCE! But I think that's pretty obvious as soon as you walk ni the door. I only take chances on things so cheap I don't care - if they're good,they're gravy and if not, well, you get what you pay for in those cases. Like the kids watches; if the face light was used at all, the batteries quit pretty quick, but young kids didn't care - they went on to somethbing else pretty quick anyway. I also lov e it that you can open the packages of things like tools and look them over before you buy. If you're only there to buy because the stuff is cheap, you're not gonna save much money. But if you have specific needs and know what you wanbt when you see it, they are great. I'll NEVER get over that $49 router! Or the $7 hvlp paint spary gun WITH accessories &flow cup.
Bad: -- Auto test set - screw drivers with internal loops for testing sparkplug wires didn't work.
Absolute Junk: -- Some stuff, but you can tell if you just take a moment to check it out.
Pop
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wrote:

I needed a buffer, and since I'll only use it occasionally, I decided to buy a cheap 6" bench grinder and replace the grinding wheels with buffing wheels. I shopped around a little bit, and was pretty well resolved to having to spend at least $30 for a grinder (plus the buffing wheels, etc., but that was still better than the alternatives I found). Then I happened across a Chinese bench grinder at Homier for $9.99.
Unbelievable price, and I thought, "How bad could it be?". I was going to strip the thing down to the motor and arbors anyway. While at the local store yesterday, there was another guy there pushing a shopping cart with ten of these in his cart. There were still 6 of them on the shelf. The box said the motor was 1/2 HP. It didn't say what the arbor size was, but again, I figured that whatever it was, I could work with it.
I'm not used to paying cash for power tools, but this time I didn't even have to write a check.
I got the thing home, unboxed it, looked it over, and thought, "What a piece of crap", but it was okay -- as I said, I was going to strip it down and throw most of it away regardless. I admired the painted (RED) finish... no overdone plating or powdercoat here -- this was pure bargain basement spray paint, and the factory was even kind enough to paint the arbors and nuts. It did have both grinding wheels installed -- a 36 and an 80 grit, even though the instruction manual (a whole world unto itself) said they were 36 and 60, and were reversed left and right from what the manual stated).
The manual was a fun read, just from the standpoint of morbid curiosity. A little like driving past a train wreck that you really have little interest in and really don't want to see, but can't stop yourself from gawking at, anyway. Some quotes (SIC):
"4. According to safety regulations. the grinding wheel must be replaced if it is worn to the size"
OK. I'll keep that in mind and replace those wheels whenever they're close to the size, just as the safety regulations advise.
"6. The flanges delivered together with our machine must be fitted during ereeting the wheel".
OK. When I'm ready to ereet the wheel, I'll definitely fit those flanges.
"9. Store the grinder in a dry place with constant temperature."
My refrigerator is kinda full at the moment, but there's room in the freezer.
I thought it might be a good idea to fire it up just to make sure it actually did work. I had my doubts. Amazingly enough, it did power up. It took a full 10 seconds to come up to full speed. There was enough runout and vibration that there was no way I'd use this thing to grind anything but axe heads and shovel blades, but I was never planning to actually grind anything with it, anyway, so I forged ahead and started removing the wheel housings and wheels. To my advantage, the tool rests and small parts were in a little plastic bag which I didn't have to mess with beyond tossing them aside. But first, again out of morbid curiosity, I took a quick gander at the tool rests, and found that they could easily be bent out of shape with just pressure from my thumb and fingers. Impressive.
I removed the wheel housings and proceeded to the wheels. I was able to loosen the arbor nuts with my fingers, and wondered how bright a move it had been to actually power the machine up without checking those arbor nuts first. Not very. Somebody at the factory didn't do a very good job "ereeting" those wheels. I put calipers on the arbors, and found that they were .494", not 16mm as the manual stated (Surprise!). 1/2" bore buffing wheels would be fine, though.
Long story shorter: A total piece of crap, but I got what I paid for, and it should serve my purpose. I won't lose a bit of sleep when I've worn it out. But there is NO WAY I'd ever use this thing for its intended purpose. You'd have to be completely out of your gourd.
To be fair to Homier, I've bought several items from them over the years -- reconditioned brand name tools that I use frequently and which have held up and served me well. I have a Dewalt reciprocating saw and compound miter saw, Milwaukee hammer drill, and even a Poulan chain saw I purchased from Homier. I got good deals on all of those items, and would purchase any one of them again from Homier.
Of course, YMMV, YGWYPF, caveat emptor, and countless -isms apply.
John
John Paquay snipped-for-privacy@insightbb.com
"Building Your Own Kitchen Cabinets" http://home.insightbb.com/~jpaquay/shop.html ------------------------------------------------------------------ With Glory and Passion No Longer in Fashion The Hero Breaks His Blade. -- Kansas, The Pinnacle, 1975 ------------------------------------------------------------------
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wrote:

$18 mobile bases. I put these under everything.
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